Monday

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Tom Waits.

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Saturday

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Michael Shannon plays federal agent Nelson Van Alden on the HBO series Boardwalk Empire. "I think inside of Van Alden is a child — that arrested child — that never really got to develop its own identity," he says.

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Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Michael Shannon, David Carr

Actor Michael Shannnon talks about his role on Boardwalk Empire; David Carr, who writes the Media Equation column for The New York Times, reflects on the future of journalism; and rock critic Ken Tucker reviews a new album from the bank Deer Tick.

Fresh Air Weekend: Michael Shannon, David Carr

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Friday

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Author Interviews

Scott Spencer: Plot Twists, Where Everything Changes

Many of Spencer's novels feature a turning point — a dreadful, unplanned act committed by one of the characters. In his latest book, Man in the Woods, a carpenter accidentally kills a man, which leads him to question himself and his relationship with God.

Scott Spencer: Plot Twists, Where Everything Changes

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Rhys Ifans plays the Elizabethan aristocrat Edward de Vere in Roland Emmerich's Anonymous. The movie speculates that de Vere, not Shakespeare, was the real author of the bard's works.

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Rainn Wilson, who plays Dwight on The Office, is featured in the new PBS miniseries America in Primetime, which examines the archetypes on television today.

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Television

'Primetime' TV, Like You've Never Seen It Before

The PBS documentary series America in Primetime, which premieres this weekend, puts TV under the microscope, analyzing various tropes and character archetypes. Critic David Bianculli says it's the smartest TV show about television he's seen in the past two decades.

'Primetime' TV, Like You've Never Seen It Before

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Thursday

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"We are entering a golden age of journalism," says David Carr of The New York Times. "I look at my backpack ... and it contains more journalistic firepower than the entire newsroom that I walked into 30-40 years ago."

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Music Articles

Deer Tick: Finding 'Divine Providence' Along The Way

Deer Tick has just released its fourth album, Divine Providence. Rock critic Ken Tucker says the album takes the Rhode Island band in a more raw-sounding direction.

Deer Tick: Finding 'Divine Providence' Along The Way

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Wednesday

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Author Interviews

Reporting On The Front Lines Of Mexico's Drug War

Since 2006, 40,000 people have been murdered in Mexico as drug cartels battle each other and the Mexican military. Journalist Ioan Grillo traces how Mexico came to control drug trafficking in El Narco.

Reporting On The Front Lines Of Mexico's Drug War

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A street vendor sells her wares by the light of a kerosene wick lamp in Lagos, Nigeria. The country claims ownership of one of the world's great energy reserves, but corruption and mismanagement leave Africa's oil giant chronically short of electricity. Businesses and walled residential compounds run costly diesel generators.

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Economy

The 'Informal Economy' Driving World Business

More than half of all employed people worldwide work off the books. And that number is expected to climb over the next decade. Investigative journalist Robert Neuwirth examines how the underground economy works in his book, Stealth of Nations.

The 'Informal Economy' Driving World Business

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Tuesday

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Walter Isaacson's biography of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was published Monday, less than three weeks after Job's death on Oct. 5.

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A message honoring Steve Jobs is scrawled on a blacked-out window at an Apple store in Seattle.

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Monday

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Michael Shannon plays federal agent Nelson Van Alden on the HBO series Boardwalk Empire. "I think inside of Van Alden is a child — that arrested child — that never really got to develop its own identity," he says.

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Television

Going Under The 'Boardwalk' With Michael Shannon

The actor plays a righteous federal agent who succumbs to all sorts of temptations on the HBO drama Boardwalk Empire. To build the character of Nelson Van Alden, he says, he worked out an elaborate back story about the agent's childhood.

Going Under The 'Boardwalk' With Michael Shannon

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Drugs or pills against a background of dollar bills.

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Law

'Deadly Monopolies'? Patenting The Human Body

In a new book, medical ethicist Harriet Washington details how genes and tissues are increasingly being patented by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Those firms, she argues, are focused more on their profits than on the medical needs of patients.

'Deadly Monopolies'? Patenting The Human Body

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Saturday

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Seth MacFarlane voices several characters on Family Guy, including Brian (left) and Stewie (right) Griffin.

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Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: MacFarlane, Zombies, 'Snatchers'

Seth MacFarlane talks about his hit TV shows and his new album; writer Colson Whitehead discusses his post-apocalyptic zombie novel Zone One and Maureen Corrigan revisits the sci-fi classic, Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

Fresh Air Weekend: MacFarlane, Zombies, 'Snatchers'

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Friday

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Jimmy Fallon says he spends almost 12 hours each day at the Late Night offices, which makes the rest of his life difficult. "If I want to play video games now, I have to schedule it," he tells Terry Gross. Virginia Sherwood/NBC hide caption

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Television

Jimmy Fallon's Giant List Of 'Thank You Notes'

Fallon is thankful for slow walkers, people named Lloyd and the word "moist." The comedian and host of Late Night collects more than 100 nuggets of gratitude in his book Thank You Notes. He talks with Terry Gross about giving thanks and doing impressions.

Jimmy Fallon's Giant List Of 'Thank You Notes'

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Kevin Spacey gives "a major performance, his best in a decade," as a Wall Street executive trying to do the right thing in the middle of a financial panic.

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Thursday

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Marie Howe is the author of three collections of poetry. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

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Poetry

Poet Marie Howe On 'What The Living Do' After Loss

"Poetry holds the knowledge that we are alive and that we know we're going to die," poet Marie Howe tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. One of Howe's most famous poems, "What the Living Do," was recently included in The Penguin Anthology of 20th-Century American Poetry.

Poet Marie Howe On 'What The Living Do' After Loss

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Shelby Lynne.

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Music Articles

Shelby Lynne: A 'Revelation' With An Exceptional Voice

Lynne's new album Revelation Road contains both a torchy pop ballad and a startlingly direct song about her parents' murder-suicide. Rock critic Ken Tucker says the album is an excellent showcase for Lynne's sharp songwriting and fantastic voice.

Shelby Lynne: A 'Revelation' With An Exceptional Voice

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