Saturday

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In a new memoir, Anjelica Huston recounts her childhood in Ireland, her teen years in London and her coming of age in New York. Robert Fleischauer/Courtesy of Scribner hide caption

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Friday

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Billy Crystal has hosted the Academy Awards more times than anyone except Bob Hope. "I love doing it because I love the danger of it," Crystal says. "You have to come through and think on your feet." Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Interviews

Billy Crystal Finds Fun In Growing Old (But Still Can't Find His Keys)

Crystal isn't happy about turning 65, but at least he's finding a way to laugh about it. The actor and comedian's memoir — Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys? — is on the best-seller list.

Billy Crystal Finds Fun In Growing Old (But Still Can't Find His Keys)
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After 20 years in captivity, Joe (Josh Brolin) is released into the world with a hammer and an appetite for revenge in Oldboy, a Spike Lee remake of the 2003 South Korean film. Hilary Bronwyn Gayle/FilmDistrict hide caption

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Movie Reviews

A Korean Cult Thriller Gets A Spike Lee Makeover

Oldboy, the director's remake of a 2003 film of the same name, follows a man who's held captive for 20 years — and out for revenge after his release. Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olsen and Samuel L. Jackson star.

A Korean Cult Thriller Gets A Spike Lee Makeover
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Thursday

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Linda Ronstadt performs in 1970. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Wednesday

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The Beatles in 1965. Michael Ochs Archives/Corbis hide caption

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Music Articles

At The BBC, The Beatles Shocked An Institution

Between 1962 and 1965, The Beatles were featured on 53 BBC radio programs. For The Beatles: The BBC Archives, executive producer Kevin Howlett had to search for many of these recordings, and they weren't easy to find.

At The BBC, The Beatles Shocked An Institution
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Tuesday

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Jack Bishop recommends letting your turkey sit for at least 30 minutes before you start carving. Ruocaled/Flickr hide caption

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Conductor James Levine in rehearsal with Russian virtuoso Evgeny Kissin. Cory Weaver/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

After Ailing, A Favorite Conductor Stages His Comeback

Live at Carnegie Hall captures a riveting experience with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and a beloved conductor, James Levine, who has been plagued with a variety of medical troubles.

After Ailing, A Favorite Conductor Stages His Comeback
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Monday

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Franklin D. Roosevelt smiled upon hearing that he was leading the 1928 contest for governor of New York, more than six years after he contracted polio. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Van Ronk at the 1968 Philadelphia Folk Festival. Diana Davies/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways hide caption

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Music Reviews

Will The Real Llewyn Davis Please Stand Up?

Dave Van Ronk's autobiography inspired Joel and Ethan Coen's new movie about a '60s folksinger. Though he died in 2002, a new anthology ought to help give Van Ronk a long-needed boost.

Will The Real Llewyn Davis Please Stand Up?
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Saturday

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Keegan-Michael Key (left) and Jordan Peele both started their careers at Second City, Peele in Chicago and Key in Detroit. Ian White/Comedy Central hide caption

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Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: 'Junkyard,' 'Great Beauty,' 'Narco Cultura,' Key And Peele

Adam Minter looks at the business of recycling what developed nations throw away, critic John Powers praises two films of excess, and Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele explain how their biracial roots bestow special comedic "power."

Fresh Air Weekend: 'Junkyard,' 'Great Beauty,' 'Narco Cultura,' Key And Peele
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Friday

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During JFK's funeral, live TV coverage helped make John-John Kennedy's salute an indelible image of American history. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Thursday

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Wednesday

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Keegan-Michael Key (left) and Jordan Peele both started their careers at Second City, Peele in Chicago and Key in Detroit. Ian White/Comedy Central hide caption

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