Thursday

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Director Dror Moreh was nominated for an Academy Award for his documentary The Gatekeepers. Mika Moreh/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Movie Interviews

'The Gatekeepers' Offer Candid Assessment Of Israel's Security

Director Dror Moreh interviews six former heads of the Israel's Shin Bet security service in his Oscar-nominated documentary. The men look back on their work and conclude that continued Israeli occupation of the Palestinians will not resolve the conflict.

'The Gatekeepers' Offer Candid Assessment Of Israel's Security

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Book Reviews

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother' Inspires The Story Of 'Mary Coin'

Marisa Silver's new novel imagines the meeting of a Depression-era photographer and her now-iconic subject. Giving the characters different names but similar stories to their real-life counterparts, Silver tackles big questions about the morality of art.

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother' Inspires The Story Of 'Mary Coin'

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Jazz clarinetist Ben Goldberg has released two new albums for different quintets. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

Ben Goldberg's Variations: Two New Albums From A San Francisco Jazz Staple

Known for his work in New Klezmer Trio, clarinetist Ben Goldberg has just released two new albums for different quintets: Subatomic Particle Homesick Blues and Unfold Ordinary Mind.

Ben Goldberg's Variations: Two New Albums From A San Francisco Jazz Staple

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Wednesday

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In his new book, The Vatican Diaries, John Thavis draws on his nearly 30 years of reporting on the Vatican. Viking/Penguin Group hide caption

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The Papal Succession

'Behind The Scenes' At The Vatican: The Politics Of Picking A New Pope

John Thavis covered the Vatican from Rome for nearly 30 years while working for the Catholic News Service. In his new book, The Vatican Diaries, he describes a place much less organized and hierarchical than the public imagines.

'Behind The Scenes' At The Vatican: The Politics Of Picking A New Pope

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Aretha Franklin became a star on the Atlantic record label after leaving Columbia. Express Newspapers/Getty Images hide caption

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Music Articles

Aretha Franklin Before Atlantic: The Columbia Years

Franklin found her voice in songs such as "I Never Loved a Man" for Atlantic Records in the 1960s. Before Atlantic, however, Franklin recorded for Columbia, and in those early recordings you can hear the legend just beginning to emerge.

Aretha Franklin Before Atlantic: The Columbia Years

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Tuesday

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The Salt

How The Food Industry Manipulates Taste Buds With 'Salt Sugar Fat'

From food scientists who study the human palate to maximize consumer bliss, to marketing campaigns that target teens to hook them for life on a brand, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss' new book goes inside the world of processed, packaged goods.

How The Food Industry Manipulates Taste Buds With 'Salt Sugar Fat'

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg finds that in the film Lincoln, screenwriter Tony Kushner oscillates between old and modern meanings of "equality." DreamWorks/Twentieth Century Fox hide caption

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Monday

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Author Interviews

Whitey Bulger Bio Profiles Boston's Most Notorious Gangster

Reporters Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy, who covered Bulger for years for The Boston Globe, have a new book out about the career criminal. Bulger was wanted for 19 murders when he was captured by the FBI in 2011. He faces trial in June.

Whitey Bulger Bio Profiles Boston's Most Notorious Gangster

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Guards just released its debut album, In Guards We Trust. Olivia Malone/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

Guards: Anthems With Gravitas

The debut album from the New York trio Guards is big on atmospherics, but also features a grandness of intent that connects the group to acts as varied as U2, Arcade Fire and The Beach Boys.

Guards: Anthems With Gravitas

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Saturday

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Richard Blanco reads his poem "One Today" during President Obama's second inaugural, on Jan. 21. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Friday

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Ben Affleck as Tony Mendez in Argo. Affleck also directed the film, which is based on events surrounding the Iran hostage crisis of 1979. Keith Bernstein/Warner Brothers hide caption

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Bradley Cooper has been nominated for an Academy Award for his role in the film Silver Linings Playbook. Jojo Whilden/The Weinstein Company hide caption

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Movie Interviews

Bradley Cooper Finds 'Silver Linings' Everywhere

The actor, nominated for an Academy Award for his role in David O. Russell's film, talks about watching movies with his father as a kid in Philadelphia, his childhood fascination with soldiers and being up against Daniel Day Lewis for an Oscar.

Bradley Cooper Finds 'Silver Linings' Everywhere

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Thursday

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Author Interviews

'Erasing Death' Explores The Science Of Resuscitation

Dr. Sam Parnia researches the experiences of cardiac arrest patients in the time between when their hearts stop and when they are brought back to life. Parnia thinks of these experiences as actual-death experiences as opposed to near-death experiences.

'Erasing Death' Explores The Science Of Resuscitation

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Wednesday

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Jake Tapper's new book, The Outpost, tells the story of one of America's deadliest battles during the war in Afghanistan. Little, Brown & Co. hide caption

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Gael Garcia Bernal stars as an advertising man in Chile under Pinochet in the 2012 film No, which is nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the upcoming Academy Awards. Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Movie Reviews

Voting Pinochet Out Was More Than Just A Yes Or 'No'

In the Chilean film No, which is nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, a young ad man devises a campaign to vote the dictator Augusto Pinochet out of office using rainbows and catchy theme songs.

Voting Pinochet Out Was More Than Just A Yes Or 'No'

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Tuesday

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Author Interviews

Today's Bullied Teens Subject To 'Sticks And Stones' Online, Too

In her new book, Slate senior editor Emily Bazelon explores teen bullying, what it is and what it isn't, and how the rise of the Internet and social media make the experience more challenging. "It really can make bullying feel like it's 24/7," she says.

Today's Bullied Teens Subject To 'Sticks And Stones' Online, Too

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Monday

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Richard Blanco reads his poem "One Today" during President Obama's second inaugural, on Jan. 21. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Poetry

Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco: 'I Finally Felt Like I Was Home'

Blanco, who read his poem "One Today" at Obama's second inauguration, is the first immigrant, Latino and openly gay poet chosen to read at an inauguration.

Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco: 'I Finally Felt Like I Was Home'

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