Friday

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Colm Toibin's novel, The Testament of Mary, imagines the life of the mother of Christ in her later years. Steve Heap/iStockphoto hide caption

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Interviews

A New 'Testament' Told From Mary's Point Of View

In The Testament of Mary, Colm Toibin imagines Mary's life 20 years after her son's crucifixion, what she might have done to ease her son's suffering. (Originally broadcast on Nov. 28, 2012.)

A New 'Testament' Told From Mary's Point Of View
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Movie Reviews

Liam Neeson's Action Chops Take Flight In 'Non-Stop'

Neeson became a bankable action hero in 2008 after the thriller Taken. Now almost 62, he's still getting out of tight corners with his fists. His new film unfolds on a transatlantic flight.

Liam Neeson's Action Chops Take Flight In 'Non-Stop'
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Thursday

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Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson hosts a new TV series called Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey. It's an update of the influential 1980 PBS series Cosmos: A Personal Journey, hosted by Carl Sagan. Patrick Eccelsine/Fox hide caption

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Space

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn't Make You Feel Small

The astrophysicist says that participating in a "great unfolding of a cosmic story" should make us feel large, not small. This spring, Tyson hosts a TV series called Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn't Make You Feel Small
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Remembrances

Remembering Harold Ramis, Master Of The 'Smart Dumb-Movie'

Best known for Animal House, Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day, Ramis died Monday at 69. Critic John Powers says Ramis was like a favorite uncle who spices up the family reunion by spiking the punch.

Remembering Harold Ramis, Master Of The 'Smart Dumb-Movie'
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Wednesday

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A vehicle inside the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi is engulfed in flames after an attack on Sept. 11, 2012. "There is no evidence whatsoever that al-Qaida or any group linked to al-Qaida played a role in organizing or leading the attack," says New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Middle East

In Benghazi, U.S. Intelligence Wasn't Focused On 'Homegrown Militants'

New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick spent months on the ground in Benghazi, Libya, trying to get to the bottom of the deadly Sept. 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate.

In Benghazi, U.S. Intelligence Wasn't Focused On 'Homegrown Militants'
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Courtesy of Knopf

Book Reviews

These Stories Consider Solitude, With Echoes Of Emily Dickinson

It's been 15 years since acclaimed writer Lorrie Moore has brought out a new short story collection. Bark has some clunkers and some keepers, but critic Maureen Corrigan says it was worth the wait.

These Stories Consider Solitude, With Echoes Of Emily Dickinson
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Tuesday

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A fireboat sits amid ruins and debris on the piers at Black Tom Island in Jersey City, N.J., on July 30, 1916. Evidence pointed to German sabotage. In Dark Invasion, Howard Blum explores Germany's spy network and sabotage efforts in the U.S. at the beginning of World War I. AP hide caption

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Author Interviews

During World War I, Germany Unleashed 'Terrorist Cell In America'

In Dark Invasion, Howard Blum explores the campaign of sabotage that Germany inflicted on an unsuspecting U.S. As ships and factories blew up, "no one really suspected a spy network," he says.

During World War I, Germany Unleashed 'Terrorist Cell In America'
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Ramis, shown here in Chicago in 2009, died of complications related to autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis on Monday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for The Second City hide caption

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Remembrances

Harold Ramis On Working At 'Playboy' And Writing 'Animal House'

The comedy actor, writer and director had co-written and planned to star in the long-awaited Ghostbusters III — but did not get the chance. He died Monday in Chicago at age 69.

Harold Ramis On Working At 'Playboy' And Writing 'Animal House'
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Eric Dolphy in Copenhagen, 1961. JP Jazz Archive/Redferns hide caption

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Music Reviews

Still 'Out To Lunch' 50 Years Later

Eric Dolphy's creativity was exploding early in 1964, and he was finding more players who could keep up. Out to Lunch is free and focused, dissonant and catchy, wide open and swinging all at once.

Still 'Out To Lunch' 50 Years Later
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Monday

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Sure, you can try doing your Internet browsing this way, but we can't promise that it will help you protect your personal data online. iStockphoto hide caption

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All Tech Considered

If You Think You're Anonymous Online, Think Again

In Dragnet Nation, Julia Angwin describes an oppressive blanket of electronic data surveillance. "There's a price you pay for living in the modern world," she says. "You have to share your data."

If You Think You're Anonymous Online, Think Again
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Vertical Scratchers. Joseph Amario/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

Vertical Scratchers: Slashed Chords, Fractured Poetry

Daughter of Everything is a superb pop album with one foot in the past and another in the future.

Vertical Scratchers: Slashed Chords, Fractured Poetry
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Saturday

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Why does thunder rumble? Acoustic professor Trevor Cox explains that it has to do with the way lightning is a jagged line. "Each little kink is actually generating the sound, and the reason thunder rumbles is because the sound takes different time to come from different kinks because they're all slightly different distances from you," he says. Mariana Suarez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: David O. Russell, 'Last Of The Unjust,' And 'Sonic Wonders'

At last, Russell is making the films "he was meant to make." For a rabbi who worked with the Nazis, is judgment "unjust"? And we follow one man's quest to find the "sonic wonders of the world."

Fresh Air Weekend: David O. Russell, 'Last Of The Unjust,' And 'Sonic Wonders'
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Friday

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Alexander Payne arrives at the 69th annual Golden Globe Awards in 2012. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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The 86th Annual Academy Awards

Director Alexander Payne On Mining Every Film For Comic Potential

Payne says he first read Nebraska — about a man who is showing signs of dementia — as a comedy. We'll listen back to an interview with Payne originally broadcast on Dec. 2, 2013.

Director Alexander Payne On Mining Every Film For Comic Potential
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Interviews

Matthew McConaughey, Getting Serious Again

The leading man known for his good looks and charm has lately been taking on more serious roles in films such as Bernie, Magic Mike and Mud. We'll listen back to excerpts from an April 2013 interview.

Matthew McConaughey, Getting Serious Again
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In the film, which Miyazaki says is his last, the wind carries off the parasol of a fragile girl, Nahoko, into the hands of Jiro — who will fall in love with her. Studio Ghibli/Nibariki hide caption

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Movie Reviews

'Wind Rises' Is Exquisite, And Likely To Be Hayao Miyazaki's Last

The new film from the acclaimed Japanese animator spans 30 years and centers on a young man who dreams of designing the perfect airplane in the early 1930s. (Recommended)

'Wind Rises' Is Exquisite, And Likely To Be Hayao Miyazaki's Last
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Thursday

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A '70s con artist (Christian Bale, right) is forced to team up with an FBI agent (Bradley Cooper, left) in American Hustle, inspired by a real-life sting targeting corrupt politicians. Francois Duhamel/Columbia Pictures hide caption

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The 86th Annual Academy Awards

At Last, David O. Russell Is Making The Films He Was Meant To Make

David O. Russell, director of American Hustle and Silver Linings Playbook, first spoke with Terry Gross back in 1994. On Thursday, he tells her that after 20 years, he's finally met his aspirations.

At Last, David O. Russell Is Making The Films He Was Meant To Make
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Wednesday

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Why does thunder rumble? Acoustic professor Trevor Cox explains that it has to do with the way lightning is a jagged line. "Each little kink is actually generating the sound, and the reason thunder rumbles is because the sound takes different time to come from different kinks because they're all slightly different distances from you," he says. Mariana Suarez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Author Interviews

One Man's Quest To Find The 'Sonic Wonders Of The World'

Acoustic engineer Trevor Cox has traveled around the globe to hear whispering arches and singing sand dunes. Closer to home, he can also explain why your singing sounds better in the shower.

One Man's Quest To Find The 'Sonic Wonders Of The World'
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In 1975, Shoah director Claude Lanzmann (left) interviewed Benjmain Murmelstein, the last surviving Elder of the Jews of the Czech Theresienstadt ghetto, at his home in Rome. The resulting film is The Last of the Unjust. Cohen Media Group hide caption

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Movie Reviews

For A Rabbi Who Worked With The Nazis, Is Judgment 'Unjust'?

Claude Lanzmann's documentary profiles a Viennese rabbi put to work in a Czech concentration camp. Although Benjamin Murmelstein was himself not a free man, he was despised by fellow Jewish prisoners.

For A Rabbi Who Worked With The Nazis, Is Judgment 'Unjust'?
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Tuesday

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iStockphoto

Jimmy Fallon took over as host of The Tonight Show on Monday. "I hope I do well," he told the audience. "I hope that you enjoy this." Theo Wargo/Getty Images for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon hide caption

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