Thursday

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Iraq: What Next for the U.S.?

Author and Journalist Lawrence Wright

Lawrence Wright is an author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. He sits on the Council on Foreign Relations, and he won a Pulitzer Prize for his book The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11.

Author and Journalist Lawrence Wright

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Wednesday

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Iraq: What Next for the U.S.?

Retired British Army Gen. Sir Michael Rose

Gen. Sir Michael Rose was best known as the commander of the U.N. Protection Force in Bosnia in the 1990s. In 2006, he called for the impeachment of then-Prime Minister Tony Blair for leading England into war in Iraq under false pretenses.

Retired British Army Gen. Sir Michael Rose

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Iraq: What Next for the U.S.?

Former U.S. Ambassador Peter Galbraith

A former U.S. ambassador to Croatia and a senior diplomatic fellow at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Peter Galbraith is author of The End of Iraq: How American Incompetence Created A War Without End.

Former U.S. Ambassador Peter Galbraith

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Tuesday

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Interviews

Photographer Astrid Kirchherr

Hamburg-born Astrid Kirchherr met the Beatles in 1960, before they were famous. She took some of the earliest photographs of the group and was engaged to Stuart Sutcliffe, the Beatles' original bassist, before he died of a brain hemorrhage in 1962.

Photographer Astrid Kirchherr

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Commentary

Geoff Nunberg: On the Stump, the Same Old Story

Linguist Geoff Nunberg offers up a few thoughts on the use of a certain C-word in current electoral rhetoric. That word is "change" and it's what all the candidates are promising. But what does it really mean?

Geoff Nunberg: On the Stump, the Same Old Story

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Monday

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Interviews

David Kirkpatrick: Campaigns and Christian Soldiers

David Kirkpatrick is a correspondent in the Washington bureau for The New York Times. He covered the politics of the conservative Christian movement in the 2004 election, and has been following the presidential campaign of former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee.

David Kirkpatrick: Campaigns and Christian Soldiers

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Interviews

Border Battles, Immigration Issues and You

Julia Preston, national immigration correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the unintended consequences of the U.S. border crackdown — and how the battle over immigration is affecting communities across the country.

Border Battles, Immigration Issues and You

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Friday

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Interviews

Actor Peter Fonda, Headed West to 'Yuma'

Actor Peter Fonda is probably best known for his role in the cult-classic road movie Easy Rider. His new picture, 3:10 to Yuma, is a Western — a remake of the 1957 film. Fonda, son of actor Henry Fonda, is author of the memoir Don't Tell Dad.

Actor Peter Fonda, Headed West to 'Yuma'

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Thursday

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David Rieff, 'Swimming in a Sea of Death'

Diagnosed with cancer for the third time, Susan Sontag signed on for a harsh treatment regimen in hopes it would keep her alive. But it only added to her suffering. Her son, journalist David Rieff, has published a memoir about his mother's "revolt against death."

David Rieff, 'Swimming in a Sea of Death'

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Cooking 'Everything Vegetarian' with Mark Bittman

New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman talks with David Bianculli about his new book How to Cook Everything Vegetarian. It's the most recent in Bittman's series of "How to Cook Everything" books.

Cooking 'Everything Vegetarian' with Mark Bittman

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Wednesday

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Interviews

'Republic of Suffering' Author Drew Gilpin Faust

Historian Drew Gilpin Faust writes that Civil War deaths — both their number and their manner — transformed America. Her new book is This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War.

'Republic of Suffering' Author Drew Gilpin Faust

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Tuesday

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Interviews

Actor Paul Dano, 'There Will Be Blood'

In Paul Thomas Anderson's new film There Will Be Blood, the young actor Paul Dano plays a rural preacher at odds with the oilman (Daniel Day-Lewis) at the center of the story. Dano previously appeared in Little Miss Sunshine, playing the teen who was an elective mute.

Actor Paul Dano, 'There Will Be Blood'

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Monday

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Interviews

Fees, Cheats and 'Gotcha Capitalism'

Columnist Bob Sullivan covers Internet scams and consumer fraud for MSNBC.com, where he writes a column called The Red Tape Chronicles. His new book is about the hidden fees found in many phone, cable, credit card and other bills.

Fees, Cheats and 'Gotcha Capitalism'

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Music Articles

In '60s San Francisco, Love Was the Song

Rock historian Ed Ward remembers the sound of San Francisco in the '60s, from the early days of countercultural upheaval through the Summer of Love in 1967. It's all lavishly documented in Love is the Song We Sing, a new four-disc set from Rhino Records.

In '60s San Francisco, Love Was the Song

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Friday

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Music Articles

Dave Grohl's Foo Fighters Rock to the Top

The Foo Fighters latest album, Echoes, Silence, Patience, & Grace is nominated for a Grammy for album of the year. Dave Grohl, the group's leader, talks about the band's evolution, and about his past role as drummer for the band Nirvana.

Dave Grohl's Foo Fighters Rock to the Top

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