Friday

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Interviews

Charles Ardai: Hard Case Shows a Soft Spot for Pulp

Author Charles Ardai is founder of Hard Case Crime, a publishing group that reprints classic crime fiction and publishes new pulp fiction in paperback editions. Ardai, who writes under the pen name Richard Aleas, has won the Edgar Award for mystery writing.

Charles Ardai: Hard Case Shows a Soft Spot for Pulp

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Remembrances

In Claxton's Death, A Photo Pioneer Lost

Photographer William Claxton got his start taking photos of jazz musicians in natural settings instead of smoky lounges. His 1967 film Basic Black was considered the first fashion video. He died Oct. 11 from congestive heart failure.

In Claxton's Death, A Photo Pioneer Lost

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Thursday

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Politics

Lizza's 'Brief' Take On A Biden Vice Presidency

The New Yorker's chief political correspondent, Ryan Lizza, explains Joe Biden's relationship with Barack Obama — and why taking on less often means doing more as vice president.

Lizza's 'Brief' Take On A Biden Vice Presidency

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Arts & Life

Absolutely Absurd: The World Of Larry Charles

Emmy-winning director and producer Larry Charles has a penchant for the ridiculous — witness his credits, which include Borat, Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm. Now, Charles wants to turn his latest film, Religulous, into an HBO series.

Absolutely Absurd: The World Of Larry Charles

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Wednesday

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Commentary

For Candidates, An Accent on Authenticity

What do Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, Sarah Palin, George W. Bush, and John Edwards have in common? They've all been criticized for the way they speak. Linguist Geoff Nunberg has some thoughts about candidates and regional cadence.

For Candidates, An Accent on Authenticity

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Tuesday

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Music Articles

William Parker Quartet's 'Petit' New Album

The third album from the William Parker Quartet is named Petit Oiseau, after a character in a poem written by Parker. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead assesses whether the album — whose French title translates to "Little Bird" — takes flight.

William Parker Quartet's 'Petit' New Album

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Monday

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Josh Brolin: Playing The President

His starring role as George W. Bush in the new Oliver Stone film W. is the latest in a series of high-profile jobs for Josh Brolin — including the Oscar-winner No Country for Old Men. He was also seen recently in American Gangster and In The Valley of Elah.

Josh Brolin: Playing The President

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Friday

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Music Articles

Saadiq Revisits R&B Past In 'The Way I See It'

Raphael Saadiq, the lead vocalist in the late-1980s R&B band Tony! Toni! Tone!, has emerged as solo artist with his new album The Way I See It. Rock critic Ken Tucker has a review.

Saadiq Revisits R&B Past In 'The Way I See It'

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Interviews

Silverman Shocks Her Way To A Third Season

Sarah Silverman's Comedy Central show — quirky, snarky, often wildly inappropriate — strikes some audiences as clueless and tasteless. To fans, including Fresh Air host Terry Gross, it's really funny satire.

Silverman Shocks Her Way To A Third Season

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Movies

Operatives And 'Lies' In Ridley Scott's New Thriller

David Edelstein reviews Body Of Lies, a new spy thriller directed by Ridley Scott and starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Russell Crowe. Set in Iraq and Syria, the film charts a young CIA operative's growing disillusionment with his superiors in Washington.

Operatives And 'Lies' In Ridley Scott's New Thriller

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Thursday

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Sarah Palin And Feminism's Rightward Path

Some feminists have had a hard time accepting Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin as a symbol of women's empowerment. But political science professor Ronnee Schreiber argues that conservatism and feminism are not mutually exclusive ideologies.

Sarah Palin And Feminism's Rightward Path

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Wednesday

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Law

'In Justice': David Iglesias On U.S. Attorney Firings

An internal Justice Department investigation has concluded that the controversial U.S. attorney firings of 2006 were of a partisan political nature. One of the seven fired attorneys, Iglesias discusses his book, In Justice, an insider's account of the affair.

'In Justice': David Iglesias On U.S. Attorney Firings

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Opinion

Parsing The Politics Of 'Main Street'

Much has been made of the effects the recent financial crisis will have on "Main Street." Linguist Geoff Nunberg Geoff Nunberg discusses how this term gained such popular — and presidential — usage.

Parsing The Politics Of 'Main Street'

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Tuesday

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Antonia Juhasz: 'Tyranny of Oil' Is A Grave Threat

A fellow at Oil Change International and at the Institute for Policy Studies, she argues that the oil industry's grip on policy and government has never been stronger. She documents her concerns — and argues for remedies — in a new book.

Antonia Juhasz: 'Tyranny of Oil' Is A Grave Threat

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Author Interviews

The Prose Of Adolescence, And Sudden Loss

In Francine Prose's new novel, Goldengrove, a sister's sudden death leaves a young girl adrift. Prose is the author of 15 previous novels, including A Changed Man and Blue Angel, as well as the nonfiction book Reading Like a Writer.

The Prose Of Adolescence, And Sudden Loss

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Monday

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Book Reviews

Extra! Extra! Unionist Bombs Wreck The 'Times'

Radical bombers battle strikebreaking capitalists while Clarence Darrow squares off against the "American Sherlock Holmes" in this very popular history of a trial that mixed murder, politics and celebrity in 1910 Los Angeles.

Extra! Extra! Unionist Bombs Wreck The 'Times'

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