Tuesday

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Sgt. Roman Diaz served with the Bravo Company platoon from the 101st Airborne's 502nd Infantry Regiment, known as the "Black Heart Brigade." Potomac Books hide caption

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In this 2005 file photo, jazz singer Abbey Lincoln performs during a Hurricane Katrina benefit concert in New York City. The songwriter, actor and singer died Saturday at the age of 80. Jeff Christensen/AP Photo hide caption

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Remembrances

Fresh Air Remembers Jazz Singer Abbey Lincoln

Lincoln, the jazz legend who transformed herself from a supper-club singer into a powerful voice in the civil-rights movement, died Saturday. She was 80. Fresh Air revisits two interviews with the respected performer, actress and songwriter.

Fresh Air Remembers Jazz Singer Abbey Lincoln

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Monday

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In Fixing My Gaze, Sue Barry explains how she gained the ability to see the world in 3-D in her late 40s. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Dr. John, the legendary New Orleans musician, turns 70 this year. James Demaria Productions hide caption

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Laura Linney plays a suburban mom who discovers she has cancer in The Big C. "She's the reason to watch," says critic David Bianculli. Jordin Althaus/Showtime hide caption

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Friday

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Siskel and Ebert popularized the famous "thumbs up / thumbs down" movie reviews -- and were credited with popularizing several films, including Hoop Dreams and My Dinner with Andre based on their reviews. Buena Vista Entertainment/AP Photo hide caption

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Movies

Siskel and Ebert's 'At The Movies' Takes Final Bow

The long-running movie chat show, created by Chicago critics Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel 35 years ago, is calling it quits this weekend. Fresh Air bids farewell by replaying an archival interview from 1996.

Siskel and Ebert's 'At The Movies' Takes Final Bow

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Arcade Fire's new album, The Suburbs, has the ambition of a rock opera. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Thursday

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Author Interviews

The Vidocq Society: Solving Murders Over Lunch

The Vidocq Society is a Philadelphia-based group of criminologists and forensic experts; they gather together once a month to solve cold cases. Writer Michael Capuzzo explains what it was like to shadow the crime-fighters in The Murder Room.

The Vidocq Society: Solving Murders Over Lunch

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Firefighters walk near flames towering from an oil pipeline explosion in northern China's Liaoning province on July 17. Anonymous/AP Photo hide caption

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Arresting Developments: Michael Cera plays Scott Pilgrim, a down-and-out bass player who falls hard for the mysterious, magnetic Ramona Flowers (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) -- and then has to fight for her. Double Negative/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Wednesday

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As many as 100,000 people were crammed into tenement-style dwellings in New York's Lower East Side in the latter half of the 19th century. The overcrowded, poorly ventilated tenements became ovens during New York's 1896 heat wave, which killed nearly 1,500 people. Above, the yard of a tenement at Park Avene and 107th Street, circa 1900. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs hide caption

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Tony Judt died August 7, 2010 due to complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 62. NYU/AP Photo hide caption

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Remembrances

Fresh Air Remembers Historian Tony Judt

The historian and author died Friday from complications of Lou Gehrig's disease. Judt discussed his diagnosis on Fresh Air in March 2010, explaining what he'd learned living with ALS -- and how he hoped his family would remember him.

Fresh Air Remembers Historian Tony Judt

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Tuesday

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President Obama walks into the White House Rose Garden before making a statement about campaign finance reform legislation before the Senate on July 26. Chip Somodevilla/Staff/Getty Images News hide caption

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Max Headroom (Matt Frewer) appeared in music videos, a feature film, a TV series and commercials for products like New Coke. Shout Factory hide caption

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Monday

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Al Capone was a huge man, author Jonathan Eig says. "He was on the level with Babe Ruth [and] Charles Lindbergh." Hulton Archive/Staff/Getty Archives hide caption

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Author Interviews

What You Didn't Know About Gangster Al Capone

Jonathan Eig's new book Get Capone reveals new insights about the famous Chicago gangster — including how freely he spoke to reporters, the time he shot himself in the groin, and how venereal disease eventually robbed him of his health and sanity.

What You Didn't Know About Gangster Al Capone

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Published in 1968, The Laughing Policeman is the fourth in the Martin Beck detective series by Swedish husband-and-wife team Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo. hide caption

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Friday

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Author Interviews

'A Happy Marriage': Thirty Years Of Love & Loss

Rafael Yglesias' novel is inspired by his wife, Margaret, who died in 2004. A Happy Marriage spans their three-decade relationship, from their courtship to her battle with cancer.

'A Happy Marriage': Thirty Years Of Love & Loss

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Clued In: Will Ferrell (left) and Mark Wahlberg play a pair of cops who are thrust into action and must hit the streets in order to solve a case. Macall Polay/Columbia TriStar hide caption

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Movies

Will Ferrell Shines In Laugh-Filled 'Other Guys'

The Adam McKay comedy stars Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg as mismatched cops who are suddenly thrust from inside the police precinct out onto the streets. And critic David Edelstein says some scenes had him doubled over with laughter.

Will Ferrell Shines In Laugh-Filled 'Other Guys'

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Thursday

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Will Ferrell plays a bookish cop married to Eva Mendes in the new action-comedy The Other Guys. Macall Polay/Columbia TriStar Marketing Group hide caption

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Movie Interviews

Will Ferrell, Adam McKay Celebrate 'The Other Guys'

Will Ferrell plays a cop who prefers pushing paper to chasing criminals in the new comedy from his frequent collaborator Adam McKay. Actor and director join Fresh Air to discuss how they prepared for the buddy-cop film.

Will Ferrell, Adam McKay Celebrate 'The Other Guys'

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Wednesday

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A New Orleans Police car drives down Canal Street during Hurricane Katrina on Aug. 29, 2005. An ongoing investigation examines the actions of police officers in New Orleans during the aftermath of the hurricane. Chris Graythen/Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Hersch. Luciana Pampalone hide caption

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