Friday

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Dwight Twilley is best known for his singles "I'm on Fire" and "Girls." courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Cecile de France plays Marie Lelay, a woman who publishes a book after nearly dying. She makes an unexpected connection with Matt Damon's George Lonegan, a psychic trying to stop communicating with the dead. Ken Regan/Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Thursday

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Nemesis is Philip Roth's 31st work. He has received the Pulitzer Prize, two National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle Awards and three PEN/Faulkner Awards. Courtesy of Philip Roth hide caption

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Vijay Iyer is on faculty at New York University, The New School and the School for Improvisational Music. Jimmy Katz hide caption

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Wednesday

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Fox News host Glenn Beck addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 20. Historian Sean Wilentz says "there are polls that Tea Party members respect Beck more so than anyone else, even Sarah Palin, and that they consider [Beck] not as an entertainer — as they describe Rush Limbaugh — but as an educator. ... People are believing that he is really trustworthy." Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Politics

Glenn Beck: Drawing On 1950s Extremism?

In the Oct. 18 issue of The New Yorker, historian Sean Wilentz argues that the rhetoric expressed by both Glenn Beck and the Tea Party is nothing new -- and is rooted in an extremist ideology that has been around since the Cold War.

Glenn Beck: Drawing On 1950s Extremism?
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Australian soprano Joan Sutherland poses in her dressing room at the Metropolitan Opera after making her Met debut on Nov. 26, 1961, in New York. AP Photo hide caption

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Tuesday

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The flag of Hezbollah features a fist holding an AK-47. The gun has become a symbol worldwide, says author C.J. Chivers. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Monday

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Solomon Burke performs at the 39th Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland in this 2005 file photo. The soul singer died on Sunday. He was 70. Martial Trezzini /AP Photo hide caption

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Music Articles

Fresh Air Remembers Soul Singer Solomon Burke

Solomon Burke, the Grammy Award-winning  singer who wrote the hit track "Everyone Needs Somebody to Love," died Sunday at 70. Fresh Air remembers the "King of Rock and Soul" with excerpts from a 1986 interview.

Fresh Air Remembers Soul Singer Solomon Burke
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Friday

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Cynthia Lennon walks alongside John Lennon in this 1966 file photo. AP Photo hide caption

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Music Articles

Cynthia Lennon Reflects On Life With John

Saturday would have been John Lennon's 70th birthday. Fresh Air remembers the legendary musician by excerpting interviews conducted with those who knew him, including a 1985 discussion with his first wife, Cynthia Lennon.

Cynthia Lennon Reflects On Life With John
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Former Beatle John Lennon, giving the peace sign, and his wife, Yoko Ono, arrive for a hearing on their deportation case at U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service office in lower Manhattan, May 12, 1972. AP Photo hide caption

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Luke Evans and Gemma Arterton star in Tamara Drewe Peter Mountain/Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Thursday

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Peter Stone Rick Bloom hide caption

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It's All Politics

'Citizens United' Ruling Opened Floodgates On Groups' Ad Spending

As campaign finance experts tell Fresh Air's Terry Gross, the Supreme Court's lifting of restrictions has led many interest groups to dramatically increase the number of ads they're airing.

'Citizens United' Ruling Opened Floodgates On Groups' Ad Spending
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Wednesday

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Justin Timberlake's No. 1 singles include "SexyBack," "My Love" and "What Goes Around.../...Comes Around." Peggy Sirota hide caption

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Sarah Blasko led the Sydney-based band Acquiesce throughout the 1990s. Chris Morris hide caption

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Andy Griffith and Don Knotts laugh on the set of The Andy Griffith Show, one of the many classic programs celebrating a golden anniversary this year. AP Photo hide caption

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Television

If A TV Show Turns 50 And No One Notices...

David Bianculli laments the silence that greeted the golden anniversaries of classic shows such as My Three Sons and The Andy Griffith Show -- and wonders why TV doesn't have an equivalent to Turner Classic Movies.

If A TV Show Turns 50 And No One Notices...
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Tuesday

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Aaron Tveit and James Franco star as Peter Orlovsky and Allen Ginsberg JoJo Whilden/Oscilloscope Laboratories hide caption

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Monday

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In July 2009, Time magazine held an online poll asking who America's most trusted newscaster was; Jon Stewart won with 44 percent of the vote. Comedy Central hide caption

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Television

Jon Stewart: The Most Trusted Name In Fake News

In an interview with Terry Gross, taped in front of a live audience in New York City, the Daily Show host deconstructs his upcoming "Rally to Restore Sanity" on the National Mall and explains how The Daily Show comes up with material.

Jon Stewart: The Most Trusted Name In Fake News
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