Tuesday

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Area 51, seen from above, in 1968. U.S. Geological Survey hide caption

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Author Interviews

Area 51 'Uncensored': Was It UFOs Or The USSR?

Area 51 is classified to the point that its very existence is denied by the U.S. government. Journalist Annie Jacobsen says it's not because of aliens or spaceships — but because the government used the site for nuclear testing and weapons development.

Area 51 'Uncensored': Was It UFOs Or The USSR?

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Monday

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A patient undergoes radiation oncology treatment for a brain tumor. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Health

Reporting On Hidden Dangers Of Medical Radiation

New York Times investigative journalist Walt Bogdanich discusses his ongoing series on mistakes made during radiation treatments. He also details what a patient should always ask before receiving any type of X-ray, scan or radiation treatment.

Reporting On Hidden Dangers Of Medical Radiation

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Music Articles

Neil Diamond: The Earliest Days Of A 'Solitary Man'

Diamond has sold 128 million records and written and recorded 37 Top 40 songs. But in the early 1960s, rock historian Ed Ward says, Diamond was writing songs for other musicians while struggling to get his own career off the ground.

Neil Diamond: The Earliest Days Of A 'Solitary Man'

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Friday

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Melissa McCarthy (from left), Wendi McLendon-Covey, Rose Byrne, Ellie Kemper and Kristen Wiig play bridesmaids in Maya Rudolph's wedding. David Edelstein says the movie is a terrific vehicle for Wiig. Suzanne Hanover/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Verve
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Thursday

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In the past decade, for-profit educational companies have tripled enrollment and recorded profits of $26 billion, says investigative journalist Daniel Golden. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Shout Factory

Music Articles

Iggy Pop: A Punk Rocker Devoted To Imperfection

Over the course of 40 years, Iggy Pop has changed from a noisy brat with seemingly no chance at stardom to a widely respected founder of punk. A new box set, Roadkill Rising, collects many of his unreleased concert bootlegs.

Iggy Pop: A Punk Rocker Devoted To Imperfection

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Wednesday

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Nonesuch Records

Music Articles

Anna McGarrigle: On Life Without Her Sister

The Canadian singer-songwriter discusses the death of her sister and singing partner Kate McGarrigle, who died in 2010. Their early albums have been remastered and are part of a new collection, which also includes previously unreleased songs.

Anna McGarrigle: On Life Without Her Sister

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Book Reviews

'Big Girl Small': Humiliation, High School Style

Rachel DeWoskin's novel follows a gutsy 16-year-old girl navigating her way at a new performing arts high school. The book is a distinctive addition to the already packed library of coming-of-age stories.

'Big Girl Small': Humiliation, High School Style

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Tuesday

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Ian Brown is a feature writer for Toronto's The Globe and Mail newspaper. St. Martin's Press, LLC hide caption

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Loudon Wainwright III. Ross Halfin/Shout Factory hide caption

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Music Articles

Loudon Wainwright III Looks Back At '40 Odd Years'

Wainwright has just released an elaborate box-set career retrospective called 40 Odd Years — and the pun in the title is definitely intended. Rock critic Ken Tucker says it presents the singer-songwriter just the way his music does, artful warts and all.

Loudon Wainwright III Looks Back At '40 Odd Years'

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Monday

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Author Interviews

William Dodd: The U.S. Ambassador In Hitler's Berlin

William Dodd served for four years as the ambassador to Germany before resigning — after repeated clashes with both Nazi Party officials and the State Department. Erik Larson chronicles Dodd's time in Berlin in his new book, In the Garden of Beasts.

William Dodd: The U.S. Ambassador In Hitler's Berlin

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Opinion

Bad Apple Proverbs: There's One In Every Bunch

The phrase "a few bad apples" is much more popular now than it was decades ago. Linguist Geoff Nunberg says the phrase may owe its popularity to a change in meaning — and The Osmond Brothers.

Bad Apple Proverbs: There's One In Every Bunch

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Friday

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Courtesy of the artist

Music Articles

The Beastie Boys: Hip-Hop With A Dash Of 'Hot Sauce'

Hot Sauce Committee Part Two is the first Beastie Boys album since the all-instrumental 2007 collection The Mix-Up. Rock critic Ken Tucker says the new record is fresh and vital because it sounds so old-fashioned and defiant.

The Beastie Boys: Hip-Hop With A Dash Of 'Hot Sauce'

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The Beastie Boys, present-day. Phil Andelman/Nasty Little Man hide caption

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Music Articles

The Beastie Boys: The Fresh Air Interview

In a 2006 interview, Terry Gross sits down with Mike D, MCA and Ad-Rock to talk about The Beastie Boys' 2006 concert movie Awesome; I...Shot That! and their 25 years making hip-hop.

The Beastie Boys: The Fresh Air Interview

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Anton Yelchin (left) and Mel Gibson each confront their own demons in Jodie Foster's dark comedy The Beaver. Yelchin, who plays Gibson's son, uses conventional psychotherapy, while Gibson — playing a despondent business owner — uses a hand puppet. Ken Regan/Summit Entertainment hide caption

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Movies

'The Beaver': Redemption For Mel Gibson?

David Edelstein's friends all say they just won't see a Mel Gibson movie. But Edelstein says the actor's new film The Beaver, directed by Jodie Foster, might be worth a look — if only for a certain cameo appearance.

'The Beaver': Redemption For Mel Gibson?

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Playwright Arthur Laurents (center) is shown with collaborators Richard Rodgers (seated) and Stephen Sondheim as they begin work on the new musical Do I Hear a Waltz? in New York City in December 1964. Laurents died on Thursday at age 93. AP hide caption

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Remembrances

Broadway Playwright Arthur Laurents Dies At 93

Laurents, best known for writing the books for the landmark Broadway musicals Gypsy and West Side Story, died Thursday. Fresh Air remembers the writer and director with excerpts from a 1990 interview.

Broadway Playwright Arthur Laurents Dies At 93

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Thursday

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Author Interviews

What It's Like To Be An Elderly Widow, All 'Alone'

Stewart O'Nan's moodily comic novel Emily, Alone follows an 80-year-old woman as she navigates the minutia of everyday life. O'Nan explains how he got inside Emily's head — and why he wanted to write about the daily indignities of getting older.

What It's Like To Be An Elderly Widow, All 'Alone'

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Andrew Lau's Legend Of The Fist stars Donnie Yen as a fictional martial-arts Chinese hero. Variance Films hide caption

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Movies

Three New Action Movies Battle At The Box Office

A trio of rousing adventure flicks — Fast Five, 13 Assassins and Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen -- all opened this past week. David Edelstein says each one is pretty singular, in its own way.

Three New Action Movies Battle At The Box Office

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Wednesday

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James Levine has conducted the Metropolitan Opera for 40 years. Koichi Miural hide caption

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Book Reviews

WWI: A Moral Contest Between Pacifists And Soldiers

Adam Hochschild's pensive narrative history, To End All Wars, focuses on those who fought — and also on those who refused. Hochschild is a master at chronicling how prevailing cultural opinion is formed and, less frequently, how it's challenged.

WWI: A Moral Contest Between Pacifists And Soldiers

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