Friday

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Kyle Chandler (right) played Coach Eric Taylor in the NBC/DirecTV drama. Bill Records/DirecTV hide caption

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Television

Kyle Chandler: Playing A Coach On 'Friday Night'

Chandler talks about playing Coach Eric Taylor on Friday Night Lights, the NBC series about the big drama of small-town Texas high-school football. The award-winning drama wraps up its five-season run tonight on NBC.

Kyle Chandler: Playing A Coach On 'Friday Night'

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The East Dillon Lions have struggled on and off the field in the NBC/DirecTV drama Friday Night Lights. Bill Records/DirecTV hide caption

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Television

Behind The Scenes Of 'Friday Night Lights'

Peter Berg, executive producer of NBC's Friday Night Lights, talks about the virtues of shooting on location, using local performers, and what the series explores that the movie couldn't.

Behind The Scenes Of 'Friday Night Lights'

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Connie Britton plays Tami Taylor, principal at Dillon High and the wife of the school's football coach. Britton has a degree in Asian studies from Dartmouth College. NBC hide caption

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Television

Spending 'Friday Night' With Connie Britton

The star of Friday Night Lights discusses her role playing Coach Taylor's wife on the NBC drama, which wraps up its five-season run Friday on NBC.

Spending 'Friday Night' With Connie Britton

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Hallowed Ground: Hermione (Emma Watson), Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and Ron (Rupert Grint) prepare to meet their destinies at Hogwarts. After eight films, billions of dollars and appearances from seemingly every British thespian, the Harry Potter series has rarely felt so resonant as in its final chapter. Jaap Buitendijk/Warner Brothers hide caption

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Movies

'Hallows' Part 2 Works Like A Patronus Charm

The Boy Who Lived takes his final bow, in what proves to be a majestic, engrossing, proper fantasy conclusion. Critic David Edelstein approves of the film's steady aura of doom and will be sad to see the now-grown boy wizard hang up his wand for good.

'Hallows' Part 2 Works Like A Patronus Charm

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Thursday

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Author Interviews

'Brain Bugs': Cognitive Flaws That 'Shape Our Lives'

Neuroscientist Dean Buonomano explains why our brains make mistakes when we try to remember long lists of information or add large numbers in our heads. Humans live "in a time and place we didn't evolve to live in," he says.

'Brain Bugs': Cognitive Flaws That 'Shape Our Lives'

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Could it be? The iPhone on Verizon? Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Digital Life

What It Means To Be 'Always On' A Smartphone

Constantly having access to our cellphones is changing the way we interact with the world, says technology writer Brian X. Chen. In a new book, he explains how being "always on" will affect law enforcement, the medical community and higher education.

What It Means To Be 'Always On' A Smartphone

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Book Reviews

'Turn Of Mind': The Haunted House Is In Your Head

Dr. Jennifer White is a retired orthopedic surgeon diagnosed with dementia — who cannot remember whether or not she killed her friend. Alice LaPlante's debut novel is a fearless and compassionate investigation into the erosion of her main character's mind.

'Turn Of Mind': The Haunted House Is In Your Head

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Wednesday

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In 2010, Fabrice Tourre, an executive director at Goldman Sachs, became the only person at Goldman Sachs and across Wall Street sued by the SEC for his role in a mortgage securities deal during the housing bubble. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Writer and producer Sherwood Schwartz is honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles in March 2008. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Remembrances

'Here's The Story' Of Sitcom Creator Sherwood Schwartz

Sherwood Schwartz, who created the TV sitcoms Gilligan's Island and The Brady Bunch, died Tuesday in Los Angeles. He was 94. Fresh Air remembers the TV producer and writer with excerpts from a 1988 interview.

'Here's The Story' Of TV Creator Sherwood Schwartz

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Tuesday

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Global Health

Paul Farmer Examines Haiti 'After The Earthquake'

The physician and anthropologist has spent 30 years treating patients in Haiti. In Haiti After The Earthquake, he details what it was like on the ground in the days after the 2010 quake — and why the country is still struggling to recover.

Paul Farmer Examines Haiti 'After The Earthquake'

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Music Articles

From Bop To Baroque: The Modern Jazz Quartet

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a seven-CD box set featuring the quartet's Atlantic years, which span 1956-64.

From Bop To Baroque: The Modern Jazz Quartet

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Denis Leary returns for a seventh season of Rescue Me. The season premiere airs Wednesday at 10 p.m. ET on FX. FX hide caption

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Television

Heads Up, TV Fans: Great Shows Start This Week

New seasons of Curb Your Enthusiasm and Torchwood premiered over the weekend, and three other cable shows return to prime time starting Wednesday. Never mind that it's the height of summer — TV critic David Bianculli says this week will be a TV fan's Christmas.

Heads Up, TV Fans: Great Shows Start This Week

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Monday

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Barack Obama's father Obama For America/AP Photo hide caption

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Author Interviews

President Obama's Father: A 'Bold And Reckless Life'

Sally H. Jacobs' new biography, The Other Barack, follows the troubled life of Barack Obama Sr. — from Kenya to Hawaii and back. Jacobs believes that if Obama Sr. had played a larger role in his son's life, Obama probably wouldn't have become president.

President Obama's Father: A 'Bold And Reckless Life'

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Beyonce Tony Duran/Sony Music hide caption

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Music Articles

Beyonce's '4': An Escape From Her Past

Rock critic Ken Tucker says that Beyonce's new album, titled 4, is something of a risk – it's not merely a collection of new songs, but a personal reassessment of the kind of pop star she wants to be.

Beyonce's '4': An Escape From Her Past

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Friday

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Born Louis Szekely, the comedian adopted the moniker "C.K" in grade school in an effort to help people pronounce his name correctly. FX hide caption

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Larry David returns for an eighth season of Curb Your Enthusiasm. New episodes will air starting Sunday at 10 p.m. on HBO. HBO hide caption

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Thursday

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A no trespassing sign is shown at the International border Monday, Aug. 16, 2010 near Naco, Arizona. Matt York/Associated Press hide caption

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Around the Nation

Coming Out As An 'Undocumented' Immigrant

Jose Antonio Vargas, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, recently revealed he has been living in the U.S. illegally since he was 12. "This country is not going to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants," he says. "What are we supposed to do with them?"

Coming Out As An 'Undocumented' Immigrant

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A "No Trespassing" sign is shown at the international border Aug. 16, 2010, near Naco, Ariz. Matt York/AP hide caption

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In the early 1970s, a chimpanzee named Nim was plucked from his mother's arms and transported into human homes in the hopes that he would learn sign language and open a window into ape thoughts. Harry Benson/Roadside Attractions hide caption

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Movies

'Project Nim': Monkeying Around With A Chimp

Documentary filmmaker James Marsh recounts the efforts of a Columbia University psychology professor to teach a chimp sign language in Project Nim. Critic David Edelstein says the brilliant documentary reveals more about humans than it does about the animal kingdom.

'Project Nim': Monkeying Around With A Chimp

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Wednesday

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Actress Jamie Lee Curtis starred in John Carpenter's 1978 horror film classic Halloween. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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Author Interviews

Horror's 'Shock Value' Redefined In The 1960s

Rosemary's Baby, Night of the Living Dead and Targets all came out in 1968. Theater critic Jason Zinoman says the three films redefined Hollywood horror in the aftermath of the Vietnam War — and influenced the genre for the next several decades.

Horror's 'Shock Value' Redefined In The 1960s

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In 2009, Ray Romano returned to television in the TNT drama-comedy Men of a Certain Age. The show, which airs at 10 p.m., ends its second season on Wednesday. Art Streiber/Turner Broadcasting System hide caption

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Television

Ray Romano On Stand-up, Sitcoms And The Humor Of Real Life

Romano recently picked up a Peabody Award for his TNT show Men of a Certain Age, which co-stars Scott Bakula and Andre Braugher. Romano explains why he returned to TV after taking a few years off when his hit sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond ended in 2005.

Ray Romano: Standup, Sitcoms And Real-Life Humor

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Tuesday

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Author Interviews

Gene Autry, America's 'Public Cowboy No. 1'

The Singing Cowboy was one of the country's most popular and prolific film stars during his career; he also gained fame as a radio star, producer and TV personality. Biographer Holly George-Warren traces Autry's lengthy career in Public Cowboy No. 1.

Gene Autry, America's 'Public Cowboy No. 1'

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Music Articles

Dolly Parton: No 'Better Day' Than Today

Since releasing her first solo album in 1967, Parton has become a star in movies and on television. But rock critic Ken Tucker says that her new album, Better Day, returns the focus to Parton's singing and her frequently underestimated songwriting.

Dolly Parton: No 'Better Day' Than Today

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Book Reviews

How E.B. White Spun 'Charlotte's Web'

It all started one morning in 1949, when White discovered a beautiful web in his barn, glistening with dew. In The Story of Charlotte's Web, Michael Sims explores how White wrote his magical meditation on time, mortality and friendship — for children.

How E.B. White Spun 'Charlotte's Web'

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Monday

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Knopf

Music Articles

Rodney Crowell: Singing From A Dark, Raucous Place

Country singer-songwriter Rodney Crowell brings his guitar into the studio and performs songs that relate to his memoir, Chinaberry Sidewalks, about his rough-and-tumble childhood in East Texas.

Rodney Crowell: Singing From A Dark, Raucous Place

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Acorn Media

Movies

The 'Making Of The President' In The 1960s

A new DVD set follows the presidential campaigns of '60, '64 and '68 — and shows just how much times have changed. Critic John Powers says it's hard not to feel a bit nostalgic for the days when running for president was treated as something noble, not grubby.

The 'Making Of The President' In The 1960s

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