Friday

View show

Academy Award nominee Christopher Plummer (left) and Ewan McGregor star as father and son in Mike Mills' Beginners. Focus Features hide caption

toggle caption
Focus Features

Movie Interviews

In 'Beginners,' A Gay Man Comes Out Late In Life

The movie Beginners stars Ewan McGregor as a young man who learns that his 75-year-old father, played by Christopher Plummer, is gay. The movie is based on filmmaker Mike Mills' own life. Mills explains what happened when his own dad came out.

In 'Beginners,' A Gay Man Comes Out Late In Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142458703/142458807" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Island Son: George Clooney (left, with Shailene Woodley and Amara Miller) navigates tricky territory as a Hawaii man whose wife is on life support. Fox Searchlight Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Arts & Life

'The Descendants': In Paradise, A Stranger To Himself

A father (George Clooney) struggles to reassess his past and navigate his future after his wife is gravely injured in a water-skiing accident. Critic David Edelstein says the film blends broad comedy

'The Descendants': In Paradise, A Stranger To Himself

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142249204/142505246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Thursday

View show

George Clooney plays an indifferent husband and father to two daughters, including Shailene Woodley, in The Descendants. Merie Wallace/Fox Searchlight hide caption

toggle caption
Merie Wallace/Fox Searchlight

Movie Interviews

In Payne's 'Descendants,' Trouble In The Tropics

Director Alexander Payne finds comedy in the crises of his flawed protagonists: a struggling writer in Sideways, a retired widower in About Schmidt and now a family man who must reassess his life in The Descendants.

In Payne's 'Descendants,' Trouble In The Tropics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142309905/142452752" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Miles Davis performs at the 1967 Newport Jazz Festival. New York Daily News Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
New York Daily News Archive/Getty Images

Music Articles

Miles Davis' Great, Often Bizarre 1967 Quintet

Kevin Whitehead says this Davis quintet was consistently amazing, not least on its last big tour.

Miles Davis' Great, Often Bizarre 1967 Quintet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142456771/142457314" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Woody Allen's career goes under the American Masters microscope on Sunday and Monday. MGM/Brian Hamill/PBS hide caption

toggle caption
MGM/Brian Hamill/PBS

Television

Filmmaker Woody Allen Gets The 'Masters' Treatment

Woody Allen is the subject of a new two-part, four-hour special on the PBS series American Masters. TV critic David Bianculli says the documentary is "a smart, sometimes serious study of a smart, sometimes serious filmmaker."

Filmmaker Woody Allen Gets The 'Masters' Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142361971/142457317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Wednesday

View show

The eight Republican presidential candidates sitting at the table listen as a video of former President Ronald Reagan is played during a debate at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., on Oct. 11. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Cole/AP

U.S.

Did U.S. Tax Policies Increase Economic Inequality?

Rolling Stone political correspondent Tim Dickinson says the tax policies pursued by the Republican Party have benefited the top 1 percent of income earners. "The people at the very top of the income [bracket] are taking off like a rocket," he says.

Did U.S. Tax Policies Increase Economic Inequality?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142353732/142393699" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Tuesday

View show

Regis Philbin holds the Guinness World Record for the most time spent in front of a television camera. Yolanda Perez Photography LLC/Harper hide caption

toggle caption
Yolanda Perez Photography LLC/Harper

Television

Regis Philbin Explains How He 'Got This Way'

On Friday, Regis Philbin will step down from his hosting duties on the talk show Live with Regis and Kelly. But that doesn't mean he's retiring. In his new memoir, How I Got This Way, Philbin chronicles the twists and turns of his career and explains where he plans to go next.

Regis Philbin Explains How He 'Got This Way'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142309202/142342700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Warner Archives

Movies

Astaire, Burns, Allen In 'Distress' In London Town

George and Ira Gershwin wrote some of their best songs for movies — one of which, 1937's A Damsel in Distress, has just been issued by Warner Archives. Critic Lloyd Schwartz says it may be the oddest of the Gershwin brothers' films.

Astaire, Burns, Allen In 'Distress' In London Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140039319/142342281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jimmy Bryant. Sundazed hide caption

toggle caption
Sundazed

Music Articles

The History Of Hillbilly Boogie's Earliest Days

Boogie-woogie was a piano style that began in the early 20th century and later became a huge fad. Rock historian Ed Ward explains how the genre re-emerged as an important precursor to rock 'n' roll.

The History Of Hillbilly Boogie's Earliest Days

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140112547/142342235" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Monday

View show

Astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter analyzed the brightness coming from supernovae, like the one pictured above, to measure how fast the universe is expanding. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

Space

Exploring Supernovae Leads To Physics Nobel Prize

Astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter is part of the team that was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery that the expansion of the universe is not slowing down but is accelerating. The results of that research suggest the universe is filled with dark energy.

Exploring Supernovae Leads To Physics Nobel Prize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142248148/142248198" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sao Paulo Underground. Paulo Borgia hide caption

toggle caption
Paulo Borgia

Music Articles

Two South-American Jazz Fusions (No, Not That Kind)

Kevin Whitehead looks at genre-bending new albums by Pablo Aslan and São Paulo Underground.

Two South-American Jazz Fusions (No, Not That Kind)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142301102/142301341" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Saturday

View show

Kirsten Dunst plays Justine, whose well-planned wedding takes place as a planet called Melancholia heads directly towards Earth. Magnolia Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Magnolia Pictures
View show

Friday

View show

Army flight medics work on a Marine who was wounded by an improvised explosive device, or IED, in southern Afghanistan.

Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/AP

The Bay State Winds feature, from left to right, TSgt. Christy Bailes, SSgt. Matthew Ayala, MSgt. Jennifer Dashnaw and MSgt. Kevin Connors TSgt Weidemann/US Air Force Bands of Liberty hide caption

toggle caption
TSgt Weidemann/US Air Force Bands of Liberty

Music Articles

Honoring Veterans With A Military Clarinet Quartet

The Air Force's Bay State Winds Clarinet Quartet joins Terry Gross for a discussion of military ensembles. The group also performs several songs in tribute to the men and women who've served in the armed forces.

Honoring Veterans With A Military Clarinet Quartet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142211727/142212122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kirsten Dunst's well-planned wedding takes place as a planet called Melancholia heads directly towards Earth. Magnolia Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Magnolia Pictures
View show

Thursday

View show

Joe Henry's new album, Reverie, features all-acoustic performances from his basement. Epitaph hide caption

toggle caption
Epitaph

Music Articles

Joe Henry: An Eclectic And Raucous 'Reverie'

Joe Henry has produced albums by Solomon Burke, Allan Toussaint, Hugh Laurie and others. The versatile singer, songwriter and producer has just released Reverie, his 12th album. It features acoustic performances from a three-day jam session in his basement.

Joe Henry: An Eclectic And Raucous 'Reverie'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142210538/142174728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Justine's well-planned wedding takes place as a planet called Melancholia heads directly towards Earth. Magnolia Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Magnolia Pictures
View show

Wednesday

View show
Stephan Zabel/iStockphoto.com

Book Reviews

Life Without Plot In 'Leaving The Atocha Station'

Lerner captures the sense of everyday life with an unusual focus on thoughts rather than incident, betting on the premise that these thoughts are the events, rather than the stuff in between them.

Life Without Plot In 'Leaving The Atocha Station'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142109786/142170246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Miranda Lambert Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images
View show

Tuesday

View show

Dogs today evolved from wolves who first developed a relationship with humans on the hunting trail. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Animals

How Dogs Evolved Into 'Our Best Friends'

Naturalist Mark Derr says our friendship with dogs and wolves goes back thousands of years more than previously believed. His new book explores how the relationship between humans and wolves developed.

How Dogs Evolved Into 'Our Best Friends'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142100653/142131852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two pedestrians stand on Broadway at West 44th Street in New York's Times Square on a November night in 1976. In his new memoir, critic James Wolcott writes about his life in 1970s New York. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Author Interviews

James Wolcott: 'Lucking Out' In 1970s New York

The Vanity Fair critic was an aspiring writer when he arrived in a turbulent Manhattan in 1972. In his memoir, Lucking Out, he writes about the crime and culture (and pornography) he discovered there.

James Wolcott: 'Lucking Out' In 1970s New York

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142110033/142127979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show