Saturday

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Ann Patchett is an award-winning novelist and memoirist. Her other books include Truth & Beauty, The Magician's Assistant and Run. Heidi Ross/Courtesy of Harper hide caption

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Interviews

Fresh Air Weekend: Ann Patchett, Ray Didinger And A Country Dilemma

Patchett reflects on her first marriage, the sports writer looks at the myth of the "dumb" football player and Ken Tucker considers the challenge of keeping country music commercially viable.

Fresh Air Weekend: Ann Patchett, Ray Didinger And A Country Dilemma
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Friday

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Billie Jean King, seen here in 1977, learned to play tennis on the public courts near her Long Beach, Calif., home. Kathy Willens/AP/Press Association Images hide caption

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Jane Ira Bloom. Johnny Moreno/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

Too Much Of A Good Thing? Jane Ira Bloom's Beautiful Ballads

On Sixteen Sunsets, the soprano saxophonist varies and honors melody like Billie Holiday.

Too Much Of A Good Thing? Jane Ira Bloom's Beautiful Ballads
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Thursday

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Wednesday

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Jonathan Steele, owner of Bluegrass Kitchen, fills a jug with bottled water from a tank he installed in the back of his Charleston restaurant. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Jon Pardi. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

Don't Pigeonhole Me, Bro: New Country Albums On The Borderline

Both Jon Pardi and Jason Eady have to confront the dilemma of all young country musicians: how to navigate the pop current that keeps country music commercially viable while connecting to a past that fewer and fewer listeners are aware of.

Don't Pigeonhole Me, Bro: New Country Albums On The Borderline
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Tuesday

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Pete Seeger. Joe Kohen/WireImage hide caption

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Music Interviews

Pete Seeger Remembers Guthrie, Hopping Trains And Sharing Songs

Seeger believed songs were a way of binding people to a cause. He talks about fellow folk music icon Woody Guthrie and jumping railroad cars in an archival interview from 1985.

Pete Seeger Remembers Guthrie, Hopping Trains And Sharing Songs
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A boat skims through the melting ice in the Ilulissat fjord in August 2008, on the western coast of Greenland. Steen Ulrik Johannessen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Author Interviews

Entrepreneurs Looking For 'Windfall' Cash In On Climate Change

A new book explores the ways melting Arctic ice yield new shipping channels, new oil and gas resources — and potential profits. Journalist McKenzie Funk delves into the "booming business of global warming" in Windfall.

Entrepreneurs Looking For 'Windfall' Cash In On Climate Change
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Monday

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Detail from the cover of The Empire of Necessity. Courtesy of Metropolitan Books hide caption

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Book Reviews

On This Spanish Slave Ship, Nothing Was As It Seemed

In The Empire of Necessity, historian Greg Grandin tells the story of a slave revolt at sea. The 1805 event inspired Herman Melville's Benito Cereno, and Grandin's account of the human horror is a work of power and precision.

On This Spanish Slave Ship, Nothing Was As It Seemed
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Saturday

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Joaquin Phoenix's Her character, Theodore, has a job writing intimate — and sometimes erotic — cards and letters on behalf of other people. Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Joaquin Phoenix And A Self-Help Skeptic

The elusive actor tells Fresh Air about his new film, Her; his wacky 2009 David Letterman interview; and what it was like to be a child actor. And Jessica Lamb-Shapiro's new book, Promise Land, looks at what the self-help industry has to offer.

Fresh Air Weekend: Joaquin Phoenix And A Self-Help Skeptic
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Friday

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Prior to filming, director Paul Greengrass kept the pirate crew and the boat crew separate to make the hijacking scenes feel more authentic. "The hair did stand up on the back of our heads," says Tom Hanks, above. Hopper Stone, SMPSP hide caption

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Thursday

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Ann Patchett is an award-winning novelist and memoirist. Her other books include Truth & Beauty, The Magician's Assistant and Run. Heidi Ross/Courtesy of Harper hide caption

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Hard Working Americans. James Martin /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

On 'Hard Working Americans,' Songs For The Ordinary Joe

Todd Snider, Widespread Panic's Dave Schools and Duane Trucks perform in a new band that specializes in covering working-class songs.

On 'Hard Working Americans,' Songs For The Ordinary Joe
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Wednesday

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