Friday

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Charlie Haden plays upright bass with Keith Jarrett's band in New York City, 1975. Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images

Music Articles

'Live In The Present': Charlie Haden Remembered

"You have to see your unimportance before you can see your importance and your significance to the world," Haden told Fresh Air's Terry Gross in 1992. The bassist died on July 11.

'Live In The Present': Charlie Haden Remembered

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Thursday

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Jennifer Finney Boylan, who wrote the introduction, is the author of several books, including Stuck in the Middle with You: A Memoir of Parenting in Three Genders. Courtesy of Oxford University Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Oxford University Press

Books

'Trans Bodies, Trans Selves': A Modern Manual By And For Trans People

Modeled after the groundbreaking feminist health manual Our Bodies, Ourselves, the book details the social, political and medical issues faced by transgender people.

'Trans Bodies, Trans Selves': A Modern Manual By And For Trans People

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Wednesday

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This week, Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai met with some of the girls who escaped Boko Haram's captivity. The Islamic extremist group gained attention in April when it kidnapped more than 200 girls from a school in northeastern Nigeria. Many girls are still missing. Olamikan Gbemiga/AP hide caption

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Olamikan Gbemiga/AP

Africa

Nigeria's Boko Haram 'More Extreme Than Al-Qaida,' Journalist Says

Journalist Alex Perry wrote the new e-book The Hunt for Boko Haram: Investigating the Terror Tearing Nigeria Apart. He says Boko Haram doesn't have logical reasons for the atrocious acts it commits.

Nigeria's Boko Haram 'More Extreme Than Al-Qaida,' Journalist Says

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Tuesday

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Angela Ricketts, whose husband deployed eight times over 22 years, says she had to get over resentment around parenting their three kids alone while he was gone. Courtesy of Counterpoint Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Counterpoint Press

Author Interviews

An Army Wife Charts Her Struggles In 'No Man's War'

In her new book, Angela Ricketts writes about raising three kids while her husband deployed eight times over 22 years. Each separation "kind of blackens your soul," she says.

An Army Wife Charts Her Struggles In 'No Man's War'

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Monday

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Author Beth Macy worked for years as a reporter for the Roanoke Times. "When I became a journalist, I gravitated to those kinds of stories of what I call 'outsiders and underdogs,' " she says. David Hungate/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co. hide caption

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David Hungate/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

Author Interviews

How A Factory Man Fought To Save His Furniture Company

Virginia furniture owner John Bassett III was determined to beat out foreign competitors. Author Beth Macy documents him, and the collapse of the U.S. furniture industry, in her new book, Factory Man.

How A Factory Man Fought To Save His Furniture Company

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Book Reviews

'Mockingbird Next Door': A Genteel Peek Into Harper Lee's Quiet Life

After Harper Lee wrote To Kill A Mockingbird, she became a recluse and lived with her sister, Alice, in Alabama. Reporter Marja Mills uses rich detail to provides glimpses into their twilight years.

'Mockingbird Next Door': A Genteel Peek Into Harper Lee's Quiet Life

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Remembrances

'Fresh Air' Remembers South African Writer Nadine Gordimer

Nadine Gordimer has written about the agonies of apartheid in her novels and short stories. She died Sunday at the age of 90. In 1989, she spoke with Terry Gross during a visit to the U.S.

'Fresh Air' Remembers South African Writer Nadine Gordimer

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Saturday

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Ellar Coltrane, who plays Mason in the new movie Boyhood, was 6 years old when director Richard Linklater picked him for the role. Courtesy of Matt Lankes hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Lankes

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Richard Linklater, Strand Of Oaks And Brian Krebs

Writer-director Richard Linklater discusses his new film Boyhood; Ken Tucker has a review of the latest Strand Of Oaks album; and blogger Brian Krebs talks about covering cybercriminals.

Fresh Air Weekend: Richard Linklater, Strand Of Oaks And Brian Krebs

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Friday

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Remembrances

'Fresh Air' Remembers Soul Singer And Songwriter Bobby Womack

Womack sang for a gospel group with his brothers called the Valentinos. It's All Over Now was their first international hit. Womack, who died June 27 at the age of 70, talked with Terry Gross in 1999.

'Fresh Air' Remembers Soul Singer And Songwriter Bobby Womack

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Movie Reviews

In A Remarkable Feat, 'Boyhood' Makes Time Visible

Boyhood is about a boy in Texas whose parents have separated. Filmed over 12 years, audiences watch him grow up — and his worldview evolve. The cumulative power of the movie is tremendous.

In A Remarkable Feat, 'Boyhood' Makes Time Visible

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Thursday

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Ellar Coltrane, who plays Mason in the new movie Boyhood, was 6 years old when director Richard Linklater picked him for the role. Courtesy of Matt Lankes hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Lankes

Movie Interviews

Filmed Over 12 Years, 'Boyhood' Follows A Kid's Coming Of Age

Writer-director Richard Linklater says picking the film's star was vital because he had to guess what he'd be like at 18. "I just went with a kid who seemed kind of the most interesting."

Filmed Over 12 Years, 'Boyhood' Follows A Kid's Coming Of Age

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Books

10 Years Later, Mystery Heroine 'Maisie Dobbs' Gains New Life

Jacqueline Winspear's debut mystery, Maisie Dobbs, set in England around World War I, came out in paperback a decade ago. A new edition testifies to the enduring allure of the traditional mystery.

10 Years Later, Mystery Heroine 'Maisie Dobbs' Gains New Life

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Fred Hersch. Vincent Soyez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Vincent Soyez/Courtesy of the artist

Music

Fred Hersch Knows His Trios

Fred Hersch pulls together jazz piano traditions that have little in common. Kevin Whitehead says the classic piano, bass and drums trio format suits Hersch best of all in a review of Floating.

Fred Hersch Knows His Trios

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Wednesday

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The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The Salt

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

Laurence Packer says humans need to appreciate both domestic bees and the some 20,000 species of wild bees. His book Keeping The Bees explores all types, including some that feed on tears.

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

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The threat is both viral and vampire in The Strain, a show about the sudden outbreak of a disease that kills most of its victims — then begins to mutate them into another species entirely. Michael Gibson/FX hide caption

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Michael Gibson/FX

Television

'The Strain' And 'Extant' Play On Fears Of Forces Out Of Our Control

This week, two new TV series begin in the threats-from-nowhere genre: Extant on CBS and The Strain on FX. The better of the two, The Strain, about a disease outbreak, is effectively creepy.

'The Strain' And 'Extant' Play On Fears Of Forces Out Of Our Control

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Tuesday

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Journalist Brian Krebs spends time in the dark areas of the Internet, where hackers steal data off credit cards and sell the information in online underground stores. Krebs has learned computer code and how to get onto black market websites and cybercrime networks. iStockphoto hide caption

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All Tech Considered

The Hazards Of Probing The Internet's Dark Side

Brian Krebs, who broke the Target security breach story last year, says cybercriminals are "some very bad people." He tells Terry Gross about how they have found creative ways to taunt him.

The Hazards Of Probing The Internet's Dark Side

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In the new French film Violette, Emmanuelle Devos plays a fictionalized character based on Violette Leduc, the trailblazing French novelist. Courtesy of Adopt Films hide caption

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Courtesy of Adopt Films

Movie Reviews

'Violette' Evokes Exasperating Self-Pity, A Trait The French Like

The film Violette is a fictionalized portrait of Violette Leduc, the trailblazing French novelist who was considered difficult. The strangely gripping movie captures a key moment in feminist history.

'Violette' Evokes Exasperating Self-Pity, A Trait The French Like

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