Monday

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Author Interviews

'Sweetness #9' Satirizes Food Wars And Artificial America

The novel is about a flavor chemist who tests a sweetener on lab rats and monkeys and finds side effects the company covers up. Author Stephan Eirik Clark says he was inspired by Fast Food Nation.

'Sweetness #9' Satirizes Food Wars And Artificial America

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The Salt

Seeking Proof For Why We Feel Terrible After Too Many Drinks

Author Adam Rogers says there are lots of myths about what causes hangovers. His new book, Proof: The Science of Booze, explores these and other scientific mysteries of alcohol's effect on the body.

Seeking Proof For Why We Feel Terrible After Too Many Drinks

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Saturday

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The Titan II intercontinental-range missile, pictured in 1965, sits ready for launch on its 150-feet-deep underground launchpad. "The one warhead on a Titan II had three times the explosive force of all the bombs used by all the armies in the second world war combined — including both atomic bombs," says investigative reporter Eric Schlosser. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Eric Schlosser, Spoon's New Album And 'The Knick' Creators

Eric Schlosser's discusses his new book Command and Control; Ken Tucker reviews Spoon's They Want My Soul; The Knick creators talk about their new drama set in a New York hospital in 1900.

Fresh Air Weekend: Eric Schlosser, Spoon's New Album And 'The Knick' Creators

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Friday

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Lauren Bacall says she never set out to have a look. "It was just a way to keep my head steady," she insists. Baron/Getty Images hide caption

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Baron/Getty Images

Remembrances

In Acting And In Life, Lauren Bacall 'Loved The Idea Of Adventure'

Lauren Bacall died Tuesday in New York at the age of 89. In 1994, she talked with Fresh Air about her early career, working with Marilyn Monroe and her intense love affair with Humphrey Bogart.

In Acting And In Life, Lauren Bacall 'Loved The Idea Of Adventure'

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Sports

At 49, Jamie Moyer's Pitching Career Goes Into Extra Innings

In a new memoir called Just Tell Me I Can't, Moyer explains how he became a better pitcher in his 40s than his 20s. Originally broadcast Oct. 2, 2013.

At 49, Jamie Moyer's Pitching Career Goes Into Extra Innings

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Thursday

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Television

How 'The Knick' Creators Capture Turn-Of-The-Century Operating Scenes

The drama is set in a New York hospital in 1900, when surgeons were developing new techniques. Series creators Jack Amiel and Michael Begler and medical historian Stanley Burns talk about the show.

How 'The Knick' Creators Capture Turn-Of-The-Century Operating Scenes

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Science

A Scientist's Mission To Break The Itch-Scratch Cycle

Dr. Gil Yosipovitch is a leading scientist in the field of itch. He says he hopes to gain more respect for the debilitating power of chronic itch — and to get more doctors on the search for a cure.

A Scientist's Mission To Break The Itch-Scratch Cycle

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Compared with The Trip, in The Trip to Italy Coogan (right) is gloomier and Brydon is more ambitious. Courtesy of IFC Films hide caption

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Courtesy of IFC Films

Movie Reviews

British Comedians Take A 'Trip To Italy' And Make Fun Of Each Other

In the sequel to The Trip, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon drive around Italy, instead of England, and engage in lively banter. The film isn't freighted with ambition, but it's extremely enjoyable.

British Comedians Take A 'Trip To Italy' And Make Fun Of Each Other

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Wednesday

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Politics

'This Is A Congress That's Really Doing Nothing,' Says NYT Reporter

Congressional reporter Jonathan Weisman gives his take on the 113th Congress, including how House Speaker John Boehner has little sway, and business in the Senate has virtually ground to a halt.

'This Is A Congress That's Really Doing Nothing,' Says NYT Reporter

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David Suchet plays Hercule Poirot in Agatha Christie's Poirot. The last season premiers Aug. 25 on Acorn TV. /Courtesy of Acorn TV/ITV hide caption

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/Courtesy of Acorn TV/ITV

Television

Case Closed: Agatha Christie's Detective Poirot Solves His Last TV Mystery

After decades on air, Poirot's 13th and final season begins Aug. 25. David Suchet still stars as detective Hercule Poirot, but you won't find the show on PBS. So where is it?

Case Closed: Agatha Christie's Detective Poirot Solves His Last TV Mystery

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Tuesday

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Comedian Robin Williams performs at a comedy festival in New York in 2007. Williams died Monday at age 63. Evan Agostini/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/AP

Remembrances

Robin Williams: In Looking For Laughs, 'You Have To Be Deeply Honest'

The comedian and actor died Monday at age 63. In 2006, Williams spoke with Fresh Air's Terry Gross about improvising, his training and how people expected him to act crazy.

Robin Williams: In Looking For Laughs, 'You Have To Be Deeply Honest'

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Book Reviews

In A Funny New Novel, A Weary Professor Writes To 'Dear Committee Members'

Julie Schumacher's anti-hero pens recommendations for junior colleagues, lackluster students and former lovers. The novel deftly mixes comedy with social criticism and righteous outrage.

In A Funny New Novel, A Weary Professor Writes To 'Dear Committee Members'

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Monday

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The Titan II intercontinental-range missile, pictured in 1965, sits ready for launch on its 150-feet-deep underground launchpad. "The one warhead on a Titan II had three times the explosive force of all the bombs used by all the armies in the second world war combined — including both atomic bombs," says investigative reporter Eric Schlosser. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Author Interviews

Nuclear 'Command And Control': A History Of False Alarms And Near Catastrophes

Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation, spent six years researching America's nuclear weapons. In Command and Control, he details explosions, false attack alerts and accidentally dropped bombs.

Nuclear 'Command And Control': A History Of False Alarms And Near Catastrophes

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Saturday

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On Masters of Sex, Allison Janney plays Margaret Scully. Janney was nominated for an Emmy as outstanding guest actress in a drama series for her performance. Frank W Ockenfels 3/Showtime hide caption

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Frank W Ockenfels 3/Showtime

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Allison Janney, Jason Hamacher, Pinterest And Interactive TV

Allison Janney talks sex, Sorkin and being the tallest women in the room; Jason Hamacher preserved Syrian chants; Pinterest offers "guided search"; and interactive TV has a long history.

Fresh Air Weekend: Allison Janney, Jason Hamacher, Pinterest And Interactive TV

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Friday

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Author Interviews

For Novelist Jonathan Lethem, Radicalism Runs In The Family

His new book, Dissident Gardens, follows three generations of an activist family. The book is fiction, but its characters were inspired by Lethem's own story. Originally broadcast Sept. 9, 2013.

For Novelist Jonathan Lethem, Radicalism Runs In The Family

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Music Reviews

Jaki Byard, A Post-Bebop Pianist Who Was A Master Of Stride Piano

On The Late Show, a set of previously unheard solo music from 1979, the jazz pianist employs techniques like suspenseful dropouts. He had a rare ability to sound archaic — and way ahead of his time.

Jaki Byard, A Post-Bebop Pianist Who Was A Master Of Stride Piano

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Movie Reviews

In The Irish Film 'Calvary,' A Priest's Crisis Of Faith Is Weirdly Jokey

John Michael McDonagh's new movie stars Brendan Gleeson as a priest who must eventually face off against a killer. It's excruciatingly obvious and inept, but Gleeson brings it alive.

In The Irish Film 'Calvary,' A Priest's Crisis Of Faith Is Weirdly Jokey

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Thursday

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Between 2006 and 2010, Jason Hamacher made many trips to Syria to photograph and record ancient chants. Jason Hamacher/Lost Origins Productions hide caption

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Jason Hamacher/Lost Origins Productions

Music Interviews

Before War, A Punk Drummer Preserved Syrian Chants

Jason Hamacher wasn't trained as a photographer, a musicologist or a member of a religious community. The former Frodus drummer simply felt compelled to document this music.

Before War, A Punk Drummer Preserved Syrian Chants

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Dave Douglas (left) and Uri Caine. Jeff Countryman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jeff Countryman/Courtesy of the artist

Music Interviews

Douglas and Caine Find 'Present Joys' In The Sacred Harp Songbook

The virtuoso jazz musicians perform from their new album of duets. It features hymns based on a tradition called shape-note singing, which dates to the early 1800s.

Douglas and Caine Find 'Present Joys' In The Sacred Harp Songbook

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On The Knick, the graphic scenes are riveting, says David Bianculli, though at times you may want to look away. Here, Clive Owen's character administers a shot. Mary Cybulski/Courtesy of HBO/Cinemax hide caption

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Mary Cybulski/Courtesy of HBO/Cinemax

Television

Stick With 'The Knick,' A Medical Drama With Amazing Inventions

The new Cinemax show stars Clive Owen as a rude doctor in a New York City hospital in 1900. It may take a few episodes, but you'll care about the characters and their inventions.

Stick With 'The Knick,' A Medical Drama With Amazing Inventions

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