Thursday

View show

Dubai now boasts the world's largest building, Burj Khalifa. Zakaria says the world is now experiencing what he calls "the rise of the rest," where countries around the world are growing at previously unthinkable rates. Marwan Naamani/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marwan Naamani/Getty Images
View show

Wednesday

View show

Marines detonate a homemade explosive device in the Helmand River valley in Afghanistan in 2009. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Gilkey/NPR

National Security

U.S. Military Searches For A Device To Stop IEDs

One of the most common dangers to American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan has been homemade remote-controlled bombs. Wired national security writer Noah Shachtman details the ongoing effort to create a device that could stop IEDs before they strike.

U.S. Military Searches For A Device To Stop IEDs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137475124/137475211" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
iStockphoto.com

Digital Life

Matchmaker, Matchmaker ... Run Your Algorithm

Online dating sites are now a multibillion-dollar industry. But how do they match people together? New Yorker writer Nick Paumgarten recently profiled several of the major online dating websites to find out how they pair people with compatible romantic mates.

Matchmaker, Matchmaker ... Run Your Algorithm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137456270/137494596" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thelonious Monk, photographed at Minton's Playhouse in 1947. William Gottlieb/Library of Congress via Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
William Gottlieb/Library of Congress via Flickr

Music Articles

Thelonious Monk: Making The Piano Hum

When Monk's band arrived late in San Francisco, it inspired a solo album recorded in 1959.

Thelonious Monk: Making The Piano Hum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137495438/137495450" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Tuesday

View show
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fresh Food

How Industrial Farming 'Destroyed' The Tasty Tomato

In his new book, Tomatoland, food writer Barry Estabrook details the life of the mass-produced tomato — and the environmental and human costs of the tomato industry. Today's tomatoes, he says, are bred for shipping and not for taste.

How Industrial Farming 'Destroyed' The Tasty Tomato

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137371975/137400592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Buddy Holly. Popperfoto/Popperfoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Popperfoto/Popperfoto/Getty Images

Music Articles

'Rave On Buddy Holly' Pays Tribute To Holly's Soul

A new tribute album celebrating Buddy Holly has just been released, featuring artists like Lou Reed, Paul McCartney and Cee Lo Green. Rock critic Ken Tucker says Rave On Buddy Holly is the "rare tribute album that, by and large, succeeds artistically."

'Rave On Buddy Holly' Pays Tribute To Holly's Soul

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137112851/137470454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Monday

View show
ROAD MOVIES/ARGOS FILMS/WDR

Remembrances

'Just One More Thing' About Peter Falk, TV's 'Columbo'

Peter Falk, who was known for his portrayal of the disheveled and seemingly inept homicide detective Lt. Columbo, died on Thursday at age 83. Fresh Air remembers the actor with excerpts from a 1995 interview.

'Just One More Thing' About Falk, TV's 'Columbo'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137446127/137398054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Research from Stanford University showed that while Philadelphia had a slightly higher percentage of charter schools outperforming traditional public schools, the city also had many more charter schools — more than half, in some categories — where the students weren't performing as well as they did at their previous school. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Education

Investigating Charter Schools Fraud In Philadelphia

Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Martha Woodall details her ongoing investigation into Philadelphia's charter school system, where 19 of the 74 charter schools operating in the city are under investigation for fraud, financial mismanagement and conflicts of interest.

Investigating Charter Schools Fraud In Philadelphia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137444337/137400561" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Friday

View show

A self-portrait by Rembrandt, valued at $36 million, was taken from the Swedish National Museum in 2000. Robert Wittman, founder of the FBI's Art Crime Team, went undercover — as an authenticator for an Eastern European mob group — to recover it. Swedish National Museum hide caption

toggle caption
Swedish National Museum

Javier Bardem plays Uxbal, a hustler moving counterfeit goods, in Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Biutiful. Jose Haro/Roadside Attractions hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Haro/Roadside Attractions

Movie Interviews

Javier Bardem Reflects On A 'Biutiful' Acting Career

The Spanish actor received his third Academy Award nomination for his performance in Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's film Biutiful. Bardem reflects on his role in Biutiful, as well as his performances in Before Night Falls and No Country for Old Men.

Javier Bardem Reflects On A 'Biutiful' Acting Career

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136613696/137395737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Middle-school "educator" Elizabeth Halsey (Cameron Diaz) favors short skirts and stilettos — and enlists her students to hold a car wash raising funds for her breast implants. Gemma LaMana/Sony Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Gemma LaMana/Sony Pictures

Movies

Class Is Dismissed: 'Bad Teacher' Is Crude, But Fun

How bad is this teacher? Director Jake Kasdan stuffs ineptness and inappropriateness into the lesson plan in equal measure. But critic David Edelstein says that the film's moral turpitude is also the source of its charm.

Class Is Dismissed: 'Bad Teacher' Is Crude, But Fun

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137378586/137395609" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Thursday

View show
Courtesy of the artist
View show

Wednesday

View show

Demian Bichir stars in A Better Life as a Mexican immigrant living illegally in Los Angeles, trying to provide the best life he can for his son Luis (Jose Julian). Merrick Morton/Summit Publicity hide caption

toggle caption
Merrick Morton/Summit Publicity

Movie Interviews

Chris Weitz: From 'New Moon' To 'A Better Life'

The director's latest film follows a Mexican immigrant living illegally in Los Angeles who tries to evade immigration officials and the city's pervasive gang culture. It's a far cry from Weitz's earlier films, the blockbusters The Golden Compass and New Moon.

Chris Weitz: From 'New Moon' To 'A Better Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137227086/137342917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A creation of Christoph Niemann's. Christoph Neimann/Greenwillow Books hide caption

toggle caption
Christoph Neimann/Greenwillow Books
View show

Tuesday

View show

Author Interviews

'Death And After In Iraq': Memoir Of A Mortuary

Marine Jess Goodell spent eight months recovering and processing the remains of fallen troops in the Mortuary Affairs unit. "I don't think I ever stopped smelling death when I was in Iraq," she says.

'Death And After In Iraq': Memoir Of A Mortuary

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137304590/137319985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Monday

View show
Criterion

Music Articles

Like Gilbert And Sullivan? You'll Love These DVDs

Classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz says these operettas on DVD are indispensable for people who love G&S, and might just change the minds of those who don't.

Like Gilbert And Sullivan? You'll Love These DVDs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136830607/137296368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Friday

View show

Nick Cave. Nigel Treblin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nigel Treblin/AFP/Getty Images

Music Articles

Nick Cave: An Australian On Love And Death In America

Nick Cave and his band The Bad Seeds are best known for their angry, twisted ballads. Four of Cave's studio albums, including The Boatman's Call and Murder Ballads, have just been reissued.

Nick Cave: An Australian On Love And Death In America

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137220550/137220574" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As a child, Buck Brannaman was badly abused by his father. Cindy Meehl's documentary, Buck, tells the story of how Brannaman overcame his troubled childhood and become the inspiration for the book and movie The Horse Whisperer. Emily Knight/IFC Films hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Knight/IFC Films
View show