Saturday

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On Inside Amy Schumer, the comic (here with Jon Glaser and Adrian Martinez) deploys everything from scripted vignettes to stand-up comedy and man-on-the-street-style interviews. Matt Peyton/Comedy Central hide caption

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Matt Peyton/Comedy Central
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Friday

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Carole King is a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. She has written or co-written 118 pop hits on the Billboard Hot 100. Richard Drew/AP Photo hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP Photo

Michael C. Hall has played the serial killer Dexter Morgan for eight seasons on Showtime. Showtime hide caption

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Showtime
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Thursday

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iStockPhoto.com

Author Interviews

'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S.

When the novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie moved from Nigeria to the United States for college, she was suddenly confronted with the idea of what it meant to be a person of color in America. Her new novel explores issues of race in contemporary America.

'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S.

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Saoirse Ronan plays Eleanor, an ancient (and uncharacteristically ethical) vampire in Neil Jordan's Byzantium. IFC Films hide caption

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IFC Films
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Wednesday

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In the current New Yorker, Michael Specter explores the conflict among some people who suffer from Lyme disease, and the doctors who study it. aanton/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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aanton/iStockphoto.com

Health

'The Lyme Wars' That Tiny Ticks Have Wrought

Since Lyme disease was first identified in the late 1970s, it has become the most commonly reported tick-borne illness in the country. Journalist Michael Specter talks about his New Yorker article on the disease and its controversial history.

'The Lyme Wars' That Tiny Ticks Have Wrought

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Duke Ellington (1899-1974) at the piano at the Fairfield Hall, Croydon, during a British tour on Feb. 10, 1963. John Pratt/Getty Images hide caption

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John Pratt/Getty Images

Music Reviews

'My Ellington': A Pianist Gives Duke Her Personal Touch

As a Japanese expatriate in Berlin, jazz pianist Aki Takase has an outsider's perspective on jazz and insider wisdom that comes from careful study. Her new album of Duke Ellington tunes reflects influences such as Thelonious Monk and Arnold Schoenberg, as well.

'My Ellington': A Pianist Gives Duke Her Personal Touch

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Tuesday

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Amy Schumer isn't afraid to talk sexting, dirty talk or even the fine line between rape and deeply troubling sex in her comedy. Peter Yang/Comedy Central hide caption

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Peter Yang/Comedy Central

In Sofia Coppola's film The Bling Ring, about the excesses of Los Angeles materialism, Emma Watson plays narcissistic party girl Nicki. Merrick Morton/A24 hide caption

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Merrick Morton/A24
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Monday

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In his new memoir, Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson describes his life in music — and how he mimicked beats at just 10 months old. Danny Clinch/Grand Central Publishing hide caption

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Danny Clinch/Grand Central Publishing

Music Articles

Questlove's Roots: A 'Meta' Memoir Of A Lifetime In Music

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, the drummer for The Roots, has been a musician since he was a teen. In Mo' Meta Blues, he explains how his musician father groomed him for a life in show business.

Questlove's Roots: A 'Meta' Memoir Of A Lifetime In Music

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Saturday

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As kids, Jorma Taccone, Andy Samberg and Akiva Schaffer were all obsessed with hip-hop and TV shows like Yo! MTV Raps. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: The Lonely Island, Kanye West And Carl Hiaasen

The brains behind the hip-hop parody group Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer, talk about comedy, Yo! MTV Raps and adolescence. "Yeezus" is strikingly self-aware. Novelist and Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen writes with passion and purpose about the state he loves.

Fresh Air Weekend: The Lonely Island, Kanye West And Carl Hiaasen

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Friday

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Knopf

Author Interviews

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

The famed neurologist talks to Fresh Air about how grief, trauma, brain injury, medications and neurological disorders can trigger hallucinations — and about his personal experimentation with hallucinogenic drugs in the 1960s.

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

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Yeezus is Kanye West's seventh studio album. Guillaume Baptiste/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillaume Baptiste/Getty Images
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Thursday

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In his new book, The Center Holds, Jonathan Alter looks at President Obama's re-election campaign. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

Actor James Gandolfini speaks at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards in January 2013. He died on June 19. Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images
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Wednesday

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The National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters at Fort Meade, Md. Saul Loeb/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Getty Images

Oldenburg's fascination with simple, everyday objects often led him to food as a subject, as with Pastry Case, I, 1961-62. Claes Oldenburg/Museum of Modern Art hide caption

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Claes Oldenburg/Museum of Modern Art

Fine Art

The Art Of Life: Claes Oldenburg At MOMA

Claes Oldenburg is one of the best-known American pop artists. Critic Lloyd Schwartz found himself not alone in enjoying the current Oldenburg exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, which continues through Aug. 5.

The Art Of Life: Claes Oldenburg At MOMA

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