Friday

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Election 2008

Michael Beschloss: Critical Moments, Critical Choices

In Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and How They Changed America 1789-1989, the historian looks at crucial moments in which a president risked his political career for the good of the country.

Michael Beschloss: Critical Moments, Critical Choices

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Remembrances

Lesbian Activist, Pioneering Journalist Del Martin

The co-founder of the first national lesbian-rights organization in the United States — and the country's first national lesbian magazine — died Aug. 27 at age 87. We remember her with a Fresh Air interview from 1992.

Lesbian Activist, Pioneering Journalist Del Martin

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Movies

'Trouble The Water' Captures Katrina On Camcorder

As New Orleans' levees buckled, Kimberly Rivers Roberts turned her video camera on marooned friends, relatives and neighbors. Roberts' footage has been adapted into a powerful documentary that is as much about America as it is about the deadly storm.

'Trouble The Water' Captures Katrina On Camcorder

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Thursday

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The Democratic Convention

Joshua Green Describes The View From Denver

Journalist Joshua Green discusses the activities at the Democratic National Convention. Green is a senior editor at The Atlantic. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire and Rolling Stone.

Joshua Green Describes The View From Denver

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The Democratic Convention

Mark Sawyer: Race And The Obama Campaign

Political scientist and author runs the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Politics at UCLA; he talks to Terry Gross about how Barack Obama's campaign is addressing issues touching on race and ethnicity.

Mark Sawyer: Race And The Obama Campaign

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Wednesday

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Politics

Lobbying For The Presidency

Political scientist James Thurber discusses the role of lobbyists in the McCain and Obama campaigns. An expert in campaign conduct and lobbying, Thurber testified before Congress about lobby reform and advised both candidates on the 2007 lobbying reform bill.

Lobbying For The Presidency

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Tuesday

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Health Care

A Partisan Divide On Health Care Reform

While both John McCain and Barack Obama agree that the American health care system needs reform, the candidates differ markedly in their vision of the remedy. Political scientist Jonathan Oberlander offers an in-depth comparison of the candidates' proposals.

A Partisan Divide On Health Care Reform

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Monday

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For Democrats, The West Is The New South

Journalist Ryan Lizza says it's no accident that the Democrats picked Denver as the site of their National Convention. Lizza discusses the strategy among party officials to make inroads in the West rather than the South.

For Democrats, The West Is The New South

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Friday

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Interviews

An Animated Take On The 'Chicago 10'

Brett Morgan's film, Chicago 10, uses a combination of archival footage, animation and music to tell the story of eight anti-war protesters who were put on trial following the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

An Animated Take On The 'Chicago 10'

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Thursday

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Politics

Ari Fleischer On 'Taking Heat'

Ari Fleischer served as White House press secretary under president George W. Bush from 2001 to 2003, acting as the administration's primary spokesperson during and after the events of September 11th, and at the beginning of the Iraq War.

Ari Fleischer On 'Taking Heat'

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Wednesday

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Author Interviews

The 'Religionization' Of The Oval Office

Scholar Randall Balmer explores the interplay between religion and American politics in his book, God in the White House. Balmer is a professor of religious history at Barnard College, and the editor-at-large for Christianity Today.

The 'Religionization' Of The Oval Office

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Book Reviews

'Little Book' Tells A Wonderfully Big Story

A new novel three decades in the making features time travel, screwball hidden identity plots and lively background music. Reviewer Maureen Corrigan calls The Little Book by Selden Edwards an "an ideal late-summer reading getaway."

'Little Book' Tells A Wonderfully Big Story

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Tuesday

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Diversions

Political Comedian Mort Sahl: Still Laughing

Mort Sahl has skewered presidents from Eisenhower through George W. Bush. The political comedian broke ground back in the late 1950s and early 1960s as a stand-up who looked to the day's headlines for his routines rather than relying on one-liners.

Political Comedian Mort Sahl: Still Laughing

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Monday

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Politics

Tracking TV Politics: 'The Living Room Candidate'

Starting in the '50s, TV became an indispensable tool in any presidential candidate's belt. David Schwartz, Chief Curator of Film at the Museum of the Moving Image, talks with Terry Gross about some of the earliest campaign ads — and the most influential ones.

Tracking TV Politics: 'The Living Room Candidate'

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On Television

Reporter Helen Thomas Gets An HBO 'Thank You'

Documentarian Rory Kennedy, who's won acclaim and awards for her documentaries American Hollow and The Ghosts of Abu Ghraib, turns her lens on legendary White House correspondent Helen Thomas. David Bianculli has a review.

Reporter Helen Thomas Gets An HBO 'Thank You'

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