Wednesday

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Before she took the helm at Gourmet magazine, Ruth Reichl won two James Beard Awards for her work as restaurant critic for The New York Times. Courtesy Ruth Reichl hide caption

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Courtesy Ruth Reichl

Fresh Food

Ruth Reichl: Dining In Disguise And Going 'Gourmet'

Food writer Ruth Reichl famously went undercover to review restaurants for The New York Times. In a series of interviews on Fresh Air, she discusses her formative food experiences, her restaurant reviews and her tenure at Gourmet magazine.

Ruth Reichl: Dining In Disguise And Going 'Gourmet'

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Fresh Food

'Kitchen Science': The Dinner Is In The Details

In How to Read a French Fry: And Other Stories of Intriguing Kitchen Science, Russ Parsons answers all sorts of food science questions, including why meat browns, why sauces emulsify and how frying is different from roasting.

'Kitchen Science': The Dinner Is In The Details

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Tuesday

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Fresh Food

Bananas: The Uncertain Future Of A Favorite Fruit

Americans consume more bananas than apples and oranges combined. Dan Koeppel, author of Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World, gives us a primer on the expansive history — and the threatened future — of the seedless, sexless fruit.

Bananas: The Uncertain Future Of A Favorite Fruit

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"Can something be called chicken or pork if it was born in a flask and produced in a vat?" asks Michael Spector. "Questions like that have rarely been asked and have never been answered." iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Fresh Food

Tube Burgers: The World Of In Vitro Meat

Would you eat a steak grown in a laboratory? Science writer Michael Specter examines the progress scientists have made in developing test-tube meat. "Depending on what your definition of any sort of life is, this is as fundamental as any animal is," he says.

Tube Burgers: The World Of In Vitro Meat

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Monday

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Patton Oswalt is the voice behind Remy the rat, hero of Ratatouille, who likes his cheese avec des oeufs. Disney/Pixar hide caption

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Disney/Pixar

Fresh Food

Brad Bird, Patton Oswalt On Cooking Up 'Ratatouille'

Director Brad Bird decided to cast comedian Patton Oswalt as the film's leading rat after watching him perform a stand-up routine about a steak restaurant. He says Oswalt, a serious foodie himself, was "perfect for Remy."

Brad Bird, Patton Oswalt On Cooking Up 'Ratatouille'

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Alinea's version of pheasant, served with shallot, cider gel and burning oak leaves. Lara Kastner/Alinea hide caption

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Lara Kastner/Alinea
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Saturday

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Clockwise from left to right: cover art for The Leftovers by Tom Perrotta, Battles, cover art for To End All Wars by Adam Hochschild. St. Martin's Press, courtesy of the artist, Houghton Mifflin hide caption

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St. Martin's Press, courtesy of the artist, Houghton Mifflin

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: WWI, Tom Perrotta, Rock Music

Historian Adam Hochschild examines WWI; author Tom Perrotta talks about his newest novel The Leftovers, and rock historian Ed Ward examines two experimental rock bands staying true to their roots.

Fresh Air Weekend: WWI, Tom Perrotta, Rock Music

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Friday

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Jerry Leiber (right) looks over Elvis Presley's shoulder at the sheet music for "Jailhouse Rock" in Los Angeles in 1957. His songwriting partner Mike Stoller stands to the left. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Music Articles

Jerry Leiber: Remembering One Of Rock's Great Songwriters

Leiber, the lyricist behind "Jailhouse Rock," "Yakety Yak" and "Stand By Me," died Monday. He was 78. Fresh Air remembers the songwriter with excerpts from a 1991 interview with Leiber and his songwriting partner Mike Stoller.

Jerry Leiber: Remembering One Of Rock's Great Songwriters

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Comic book nerd Graeme Willy (Simon Pegg) encounters an alien (voiced by Seth Rogen) after traveling to America for Comic-Con. Double Negative/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Double Negative/Universal Pictures

In the 1983 gangster film Scarface, Al Pacino gave a "performance the size of a Caribbean cruise ship," says critic John Powers. Universal Studios hide caption

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Universal Studios

Movies

'Scarface': Over-The-Top, But Ahead Of Its Time

In 1983, critic John Powers panned the Pacino film, saying it was trashy and shallow. But he recently watched the film again, and says that in retrospect, he can see how the film burned its way into the national psyche.

'Scarface': Over-The-Top, But Ahead Of Its Time

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Thursday

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Author Interviews

After The Rapture, Who Are 'The Leftovers'?

What if the rapture actually occurred? That's the plot of Tom Perrotta's new novel The Leftovers, which examines the aftermath of an unexplained rapturelike event in which millions of people around the globe inexplicably disappear into thin air.

After The Rapture, Who Are 'The Leftovers'?

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Syl Johnson Biz 3 hide caption

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Biz 3

Music Reviews

The 'Complete Mythology' Of Syl Johnson

Al Green wrote "Take Me to the River," but it was his labelmate Syl Johnson who first made it famous. Rock historian Ed Ward traces Johnson's early career, which started in Chicago blues clubs in the 1950s.

The 'Complete Mythology' Of Syl Johnson

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Wednesday

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Texas Gov. Rick Perry prays at The Response, his call to prayer for a nation in crisis, on Aug. 6 in Houston. The event was organized, in part, by members of the New Apostolic Reformation. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP
Courtesy of the artist

Music Articles

John Doe's New Album Is A Contemplative 'Keeper'

Doe is probably still best known as co-founder of the punk-rock band X more than 30 years ago. Rock critic Ken Tucker says Doe's new solo album Keeper is less conflicted and more contemplative than his earlier works.

John Doe's New Album Is A Contemplative 'Keeper'

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Tuesday

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In 1938, A&P had more than 13,000 stores from coast to coast, like this one in Somerset, Ohio. Over the next four years, the company's transition to a new supermarket format would cut that store count in half. Ben Shahn/Library of Congress hide caption

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Ben Shahn/Library of Congress

Cheer-Accident. Kerry Anne Kronke hide caption

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Kerry Anne Kronke

Music Articles

Two Experimental Rock Bands Stay True To Their Roots

The New York trio Battles and the Chicago-based experimental rock band Cheer-Accident come from very different directions. But critic Milo Miles says that both groups have recently put out their most appealing records, without losing their cerebral side.

Two Experimental Rock Bands Stay True To Their Roots

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Monday

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Alice Waters is the author of eight books, including The Art of Simple Food: Notes and Recipes from a Delicious Revolution. Platon/courtesy of the author hide caption

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Platon/courtesy of the author

Food

Alice Waters: 40 Years Of Sustainable Food

Waters founded her Berkeley restaurant, Chez Panisse, long before "organic" or "locally grown" entered the vernacular. In 40 Years at Chez Panisse, Waters looks back on the sustainable food movement and the momentum it has built in recent years.

Alice Waters: 40 Years Of Sustainable Food

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Branford Marsalis (left) and Joey Calderazzo. Stephen Sheffield/Marsalis Music hide caption

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Stephen Sheffield/Marsalis Music

Music Articles

Branford Marsalis And Joey Calderazzo: A 'Melancholy' Duo

Songs of Mirth and Melancholy takes cues from the brooding romantic music of 19th century Europe.

Branford Marsalis And Joey Calderazzo: A 'Melancholy' Duo

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Saturday

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Clockwise from left to right: Brad Ausmus, Sly Stone, shining flower beetles. David Zalubowski/AP Photo, Ace Records, Alex Wild Photography hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP Photo, Ace Records, Alex Wild Photography

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Baseball, Bugs And Sly Stone

Baseball catcher Brad Ausmus takes us behind the plate; a biologist answers probing questions about the insect world, and Ed Ward reviews some early Sly Stone albums.

Fresh Air Weekend: Baseball, Bugs And Sly Stone

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