Thursday

View show
View show

Wednesday

View show
View show

Tuesday

View show
View show

Monday

View show

Interviews

'Washington Post' Columnist Sebastian Mallaby

His new book is The World's Banker: A Story of Failed States, Financial Crises, and the Wealth and Poverty of Nations. Mallaby profiles World Bank leader James Wolfensohn, who came to the organization on 1995 determined to transform it.

'Washington Post' Columnist Sebastian Mallaby

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4049149/4049150" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Arts & Life

Political Allegory Examines Loss of Civil Liberties

Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews a reissued book called Visa for Avalon by Bryher, the pen name of an Englishwoman named Annie Winifred Ellerman. Visa for Avalon is a political allegory first published in 1965.

Political Allegory Examines Loss of Civil Liberties

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4049153/4049154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
View show

Friday

View show
View show

Thursday

View show
View show

Wednesday

View show

Former White House Adviser Richard A. Clarke

Clarke, a former member of the National Security Council says the Bush administration missed opportunities to avert the Sept. 11 crisis. His controversial book, Against All Enemies: America's War on Terror, is now out in paperback.

Former White House Adviser Richard A. Clarke

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3931123/3931124" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
View show

Tuesday

View show
View show

Monday

View show

Author Interviews

Jason DeParle, 'A Nation's Drive to End Welfare'

DeParle is The New York Times' welfare policy reporter. His new book is American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids and a Nation's Drive to End Welfare. DeParle tracks the lives of three families in Milwaukee affected by welfare reform laws.

Jason DeParle, 'A Nation's Drive to End Welfare'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3927552/3927553" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Arts & Life

David Bianculli: Cable's Impact on Network TV

Critic David Bianculli has some thoughts about the fall season and cable's impact on network television. He says ABC may have the year's two best shows: the prime-time soap opera Desperate Housewives and the action/suspense show Lost.

David Bianculli: Cable's Impact on Network TV

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3927554/3927555" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
View show

Friday

View show

Music Articles

Saxophonist Branford Marsalis

Branford Marsalis was born into one of the great jazz families: his father is pianist Ellis and his brother is trumpet player Wynton Marsalis. He has a new album, Eternal, on Rounder Records. (This interview first aired Oct. 21, 2002.)

Saxophonist Branford Marsalis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3924317/3924318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Music

Grammy Award-Winning Musician Wynton Marsalis

Wynton Marsalis has been playing the trumpet since he was 6, and won his first Grammy at 20 and has 9 total. He's also the first jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize. His latest album is The Magic Hour. (This Interview first aired Dec. 7, 1994.)

Grammy Award-Winning Musician Wynton Marsalis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3924319/3924320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
View show