Friday

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Jonathan Franzen is also the author of The Corrections: A Novel, and The Discomfort Zone, a memoir. He is pictured above at The New Yorker Festival Fiction Night in New York City in 2009. Joe Kohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Franzen is also the author of The Corrections: A Novel, and The Discomfort Zone, a memoir. He is pictured above at The New Yorker Festival Fiction Night in New York City in 2009. Joe Kohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Author Interviews

Franzen Tackles Suburban Parenting In 'Freedom'

Jonathan Franzen's novel Freedom was called "a masterpiece" by Time Magazine and received rave reviews from critics. Franzen talks about the runaway success of his previous novel The Corrections, and the strong reaction elicited by Freedom.

Franzen Tackles Suburban Parenting In 'Freedom'

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Dark Skies: Jeff Nichols' haunting Take Shelter centers on an Ohio man (Michael Shannon, with Tova Stewart) plagued with nightmares about a coming apocalypse. Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Movies

An Atmospheric 'Shelter' For Era Full Of Foreboding

In Take Shelter, Michael Shannon dreams of an apocalyptic storm, and builds a backyard bunker for his family to survive. Critic David Edelstein says the film is terrific. (Recommended)

An Atmospheric 'Shelter' For Era Full Of Foreboding

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Dexter Showtime hide caption

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Television

Want Good TV? Try These Three Shows

TV critic David Bianculli says most shows on TV this fall are a big disappointment. But three offerings this upcoming Sunday night — Prohibition, Dexter and Homeland — are all excellent, invigorating and exceptionally intelligent.

Want Good TV? Try These Three Shows

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Thursday

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Jalaluddin Haqqani, founder of the Haqqani Network, speaks during an interview in Miram Shah, Pakistan, in 1998. His militant network has thrived and is now considered the No. 1 threat to American troops in Afghanistan. Mohammad Riaz/AP hide caption

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Water plant operator Torrey Jones checks the clarity of a sample of treated water at the Beaver Falls Municipal Authority water treatment plant in Beaver Falls, Pa. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Wednesday

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In 50/50, Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays Adam, a public radio host stricken with cancer who enlists his best friend, played by Seth Rogen, for moral and physical support. Chris Helcermanas-Benge/Summit Publicity hide caption

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Low Cut Connie. Emad Hasan hide caption

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Tuesday

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Monday

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A man stands in a sewage-filled street in Fallujah in 2010. The Fallujah wastewater treatment system was left unfinished more than four years past the initial deadline. The sewage facility is among hundreds of projects funded by U.S. taxpayers that remain abandoned or incomplete, wasting more than $5 billion, according to auditors. Hadi Mizban/AP hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist
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Saturday

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A Still from Bumble-Ardy courtesy of Maurice Sendak hide caption

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Fresh Air Weekend: Brad Pitt, Maurice Sendak

Actor Brad Pitt details his role in the new movie Moneyball. Also, children's author Maurice Sendak talks about his life and his latest book Bumble-Ardy. And critic John Powers examines Roger Ebert's memoir.

Fresh Air Weekend: Brad Pitt, Maurice Sendak

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Friday

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Oakland Athletics' first basemen Scott Hatteberg is one of the people profiled in Michael Lewis' 2003 book Moneyball. Dave Kennedy/AP Photo hide caption

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Brad Pitt plays Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland A's, in the movie Moneyball. Sony Pictures hide caption

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Ted Danson and Marg Helgenberger search for clues on the CBS drama CSI. Sonja Flemming/CBS hide caption

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Thursday

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Brad Pitt, left, plays Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland A's, in the movie Moneyball. His assistant Peter Brand is played by Jonah Hill. Melinda Sue Gordon/Sony Pictures hide caption

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Dana Spiotta's novel Eat the Document was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award. Jessica Marx/ hide caption

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Wednesday

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Maphead hide caption

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Books

Love Longitude? 'Maphead' Locates Geography Buffs

Former Jeopardy! champ Ken Jennings charts what he calls "the wide, weird world of geography" in his latest book, Maphead. He profiles Google Maps engineers, geocachers, imaginary mapmakers, map collectors, geography bee contestants and "road geeks."

Love Longitude? 'Maphead' Locates Geography Buffs

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Pulitzer Prize-winning movie critic Roger Ebert works in his office at the WTTW-TV studios in Chicago in January 2011. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP Photo hide caption

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Book Reviews

Roger Ebert: A Critic Reflects On 'Life Itself'

Roger Ebert tackles lowbrow and highbrow topics alike in his memoir; critic John Powers says the chronicle is sunny and hopeful — just like Ebert himself.

Roger Ebert: A Critic Reflects On 'Life Itself'

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Tuesday

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President Obama meets with advisers at an economic meeting in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, March 15, 2009. Participants include National Economic Council Director Larry Summers, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, Council of Economic Advisers Chairwoman Christina Romer, senior adviser David Axelrod, Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and adviser Gene Sperling. Pete Souza/White House hide caption

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The Swerve by Stephen Greenblatt. hide caption

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Book Reviews

'The Swerve': The Ideas That Rooted The Renaissance

Stephen Greenblatt chronicles the unlikely discovery of Lucretius' poem "On the Nature of Things" — by a 15th-century Italian book hunter. The Swerve is a masterfully written meditation on the fragile inheritance of ideas.

'The Swerve': Ideas That Rooted The Renaissance

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