Mollie Burkhart (second from right) lost all three of her sisters under suspicious circumstances. Rita Smith (left) died in an explosion, Anna Brown (second from left) was shot in the head and Minnie Smith (right) died of what doctors referred to as a "peculiar wasting illness." The Osage National Museum/Courtesy of Doubleday hide caption

toggle caption
The Osage National Museum/Courtesy of Doubleday

History

In The 1920s, A Community Conspired To Kill Native Americans For Their Oil Money

The Osage tribe in Oklahoma became spectacularly wealthy in the early 1900s — and then members started turning up dead. David Grann's Killers of the Flower Moon describes the dark plot against them.

Transverse Caves of Steel
Dunning-Kruger Caves of Steel
Robespierre Gifts from Enola

'Powwow Sweat' Promotes Fitness Through Traditional Dance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522994311/524301379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The laces on the left are tied in a strong knot that lies horizontally. The laces on the right are tied in a knot that makes the bow lie vertically and which, according to new research, can come untied more easily. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Untangling The Mystery Of Why Shoelaces Come Untied

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523636317/524301385" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Shoelace Osamu Sakaguchi and Rie Otsuka
Flower (Instrumental) Osamu Sakaguchi and Kosuke Shindo

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chair of the House Freedom Caucus, speaks during a news conference in February on Affordable Care Act replacement legislation. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

Voters Back Home Don't Mind If Mark Meadows Bucks Authority

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524242006/524301391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Strange News from Another Star The Halifax Pier
The Old Constellations The Halifax Pier
Between Woodland Epic45

There are signs that fewer immigrants in the U.S. illegally are filing taxes than in previous years. Ronnie Kaufman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ronnie Kaufman/Getty Images

Tax Filings Seen Dipping Amid Trump Crackdown On Illegal Immigration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523634144/524301397" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sandálek Floex
Pinky Pong Floex

Mollie Burkhart (second from right) lost all three of her sisters under suspicious circumstances. Rita Smith (left) died in an explosion, Anna Brown (second from left) was shot in the head and Minnie Smith (right) died of what doctors referred to as a "peculiar wasting illness." The Osage National Museum/Courtesy of Doubleday hide caption

toggle caption
The Osage National Museum/Courtesy of Doubleday

In The 1920s, A Community Conspired To Kill Native Americans For Their Oil Money

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523964584/524301403" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
State Lines Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
State Lines
Album
Landmarks
Artist
Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Ark.La.Tex. Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
Ark.La.Tex.
Album
Landmarks
Artist
Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

French presidential candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon delivers a speech during a meeting in Lille, northern France, on April 12. Michel Spingler/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michel Spingler/AP

Brash Leftist Candidate Shakes Up France's Presidential Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524301351/524301352" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bidwell Marina at Lake Oroville in April in Oroville, Calif. After record rainfall and snow in the mountains, much of California's landscape has turned from brown to green and reservoirs across the state are near capacity. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

From Moonscape To Lush: Photographs Capture California Drought's Story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523969466/524301409" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Masollan Balmorhea
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
Masollan
Album
Stranger
Artist
Balmorhea

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Days Balmorhea
Buy

Buy Featured Music

Song
Days
Album
Stranger
Artist
Balmorhea

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

The Most Beautiful Thing I've Ever Seen Anna Laube
Blue Love LRKR
Morning Rain LRKR
The First Cigarette of the Day Baulta
Do We Live Today? Baulta
Black Balloon Local Natives

Gail Dougherty, 61, was a project manager at Intel until she retired in 2016. Now she is working part time at a health center, part of a fellowship paid by Intel as a regular retirement benefit. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ina Jaffe/NPR

At Intel, A Retirement Perk That Can Kick Off A New Career As A Paid Fellow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523772071/524301415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sliding Doors U137
Pearl Lakes U137
Into the Sea The Album Leaf

Kevin Butt, Toyota's regional environmental sustainability director, at a facility that uses methane to generate clean electricity to help run Toyota's auto plant in central Kentucky. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Big Business Pushes Coal-Friendly Kentucky To Embrace Renewables

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523763826/524321080" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript