Marlene Dietrich in a publicity photo for the film Dishonored (1931), in which she plays an Austrian spy. Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery

Photography

Gallery Gives Movie Star Marlene Dietrich The Big-Picture Treatment

A photography exhibition in Washington, D.C., shows the journey from Berlin schoolgirl to glamorous actress.

Questions Pete Rock
The Best Secret Pete Rock
Night White Erik Friedlander
Dusk
Ghostwriter RJD2
Four (Kettel Remix)
Latitude (Remix) Nujabes feat. Five Deez
Talking Book Darshan Ambient
Sway, Sway Heinali

Marlene Dietrich in a publicity photo for the film Dishonored (1931), in which she plays an Austrian spy. Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery

Gallery Gives Movie Star Marlene Dietrich The Big-Picture Treatment

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Falling In Love Again Marlene Dietrich
You Do Something To Me
Silver
Confessions BadBadNotGood
Weight Off

Kamni Vallabh helps her daughter Sonia get ready for her wedding, a few months before Kamni started showing symptoms of the prion disease that would kill her. Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh

A Mother's Early Death Drives Her Daughter To Find A Treatment

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Ambo The Album Leaf
Off Work
Chinese Radio Puff Dragon
Greenland Emancipator
I'm a Mindless Idiot Meat Puppets

A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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A Drifting Up Jon Hopkins
Pick-up Sticks Frank Kimbrough/Joe Locke
Piano Fights 65daysofstatic