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Lupita Ramirez dresses her husband, Joel, at their home in Rialto, Calif. Joel was paralyzed from the waist down after being crushed by a pallet when he was working in a warehouse. Patrick T. Fallon for ProPublica hide caption

itoggle caption Patrick T. Fallon for ProPublica

NPR News Investigations

Injured Workers Suffer As 'Reforms' Limit Workers' Compensation Benefits

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers' compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers.

Shortening the FAFSA is a tall order. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption LA Johnson/NPR

NPR Ed

Shrink The FAFSA? Good Luck With That

Lots of politicians are calling for a shorter FAFSA — the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. It now has more than 100 questions. But, it turns out, shortening the FAFSA is a tall order.

Wilfredis Ayala, an unauthorized immigrant from El Salvador, lives in Long Island, N.Y., with his U.S.-born son Justin and Justin's mother Wendy Urbina. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

U.S.

Immigrants Worry They'll Face Deportation After Deferred Action Delay

Some unauthorized immigrants who are parents of U.S. citizens and green-card holders are worried they may be forced to leave the U.S. because a court ruling has put a hold on their deportation relief.

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Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate outside the Supreme Court in 2012, after a divided court upheld the law as constitutional by a 5-to-4 vote. The latest battle, which the Supreme Court hears Wednesday, is over whether people who buy insurance through federally run exchanges are eligible for subsidies. David Goldman/AP hide caption

itoggle caption David Goldman/AP
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