A drawing of the first White House designed by architect James Hoban, who won the competition to design the president's new house in 1792. Building began that year and ended in 1800. AP hide caption

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History

Slave Labor And The 'Longer History' Of The White House

When Michelle Obama referred to slaves building the White House, she gave a nod to a back story that needs to be appreciated, says Clarence Lusane, author of The Black History of the White House.

Kidlington is home to a number of 17th century cottages near its medieval church. This is the most historic part of the village, but it's not where the tourists went. Instead, tour buses dropped them off in a residential area built in the 1960s and 1970s. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Parallels

Why Did Busloads Of Asian Tourists Suddenly Arrive In This English Village?

Residents of Kidlington awoke one morning to find hundreds of foreign tourists snapping photos on their front lawns. For six weeks, the visitors continued to come by the busload. Then they vanished.

Full Show Audio Pending

A drawing of the first White House designed by architect James Hoban, who won the competition to design the president's new house in 1792. Building began that year and ended in 1800. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Slave Labor And The 'Longer History' Of The White House

Audio will be available later today.

Clinton was the first student to deliver a commencement speech at Wellesley College in 1969. Her criticism of Sen. Edward Brooke's speech received national attention. John M. Hurley/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Taking On A U.S. Senator As A Student Propelled Clinton Into The Spotlight

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Kidlington is home to a number of 17th century cottages near its medieval church. This is the most historic part of the village, but it's not where the tourists went. Instead, tour buses dropped them off in a residential area built in the 1960s and 1970s. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Lauren Frayer for NPR

Why Did Busloads Of Asian Tourists Suddenly Arrive In This English Village?

Audio will be available later today.