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Charles Wiwa fled Nigeria in 1996 following a crackdown on protests against Shell's oil operations in the Niger Delta. Now a resident of Chicago, Wiwa and other natives of the oil-rich Ogoni region are suing Shell for human rights violations. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Law

Human Rights Victims Seek Remedy At High Court

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Traumatic brain injuries are most often caused by powerful blasts from improvised explosive devices. A roadside bomb explodes, and the concussive effect violently shakes the brain inside the skull. Stefano Rellandini/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Stefano Rellandini/Reuters /Landov

Health

Army Moves To Act Fast On Battlefield Brain Injuries

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Alexei Venediktov, then editor-in-chief of Moscow Echo radio station, talks with Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin during an awards ceremony in Moscow, Jan. 13. Venediktov's ouster this month is seen as a sign that the Russian government may be cracking down on the independent media. Yana Lapikova/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Yana Lapikova/AFP/Getty Images

Europe

Signs Of A Media Crackdown Emerge In Russia

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Docks on the Bon Secour River sit idle nearly two years after the BP oil spill. The small fishing village of Bon Secour, Ala., is still suffering the lingering effects of the spill, despite government monitoring and assurances that Gulf seafood is not contaminated. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliott/NPR

Around the Nation

BP's Oil Slick Set To Spill Into Courtroom

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