Friday

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Adam Gadahn, also known as Azzam al-Amriki, is an American who grew up in Southern California, converted to Islam and joined al-Qaida. Here he speaks in a 106-minute-long video released Sept. 22, 2009. IntelCenter via AP hide caption

itoggle caption IntelCenter via AP

Terrorism Made In America

Two Americans Become Strategists For Al-Qaida

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Wednesday

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Haitians sit  in front of the fence surrounding the crumbling presidential palace in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in August. Nine months have passed since a devastating earthquake killed more than 200,000 people, left 1.5 million homeless and destroyed much of the capital. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Latin America

Haitians Move On As Quake Recovery Drags

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Tuesday

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In 2003, Samir Khan launched a popular al-Qaida website from the basement of his parents' home in Charlotte, N.C. Today, he is believed to be behind an English-language al-Qaida magazine that reads like a glossy American publication -- except its topic is terrorism. Screen grab via YouTube/WJZY/WBTV hide caption

itoggle caption Screen grab via YouTube/WJZY/WBTV

Terrorism Made In America

American Editor Brings U.S. Savvy To Jihad Outreach

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Monday

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National police at the Polish port of Gydnia protect shipping containers of highly enriched uranium en route to Siberia. The trip from Poland to Russia took two weeks, and the bomb-grade material arrived by train from Warsaw under heavy security. National Nuclear Security Administration hide caption

itoggle caption National Nuclear Security Administration

National Security

Nuclear Road Trip: Shipping Uranium Is Complex

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Adnan Shukrijumah, shown here in undated photos from an FBI alert issued in March 2003, is believed to be the highest-ranking American in al-Qaida. He grew up in Florida and poses a new challenge to law enforcement: a terrorist who is not only familiar with the United States but deeply understands it. FBI/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption FBI/Getty Images

Terrorism Made In America

Al-Qaida Mastermind Rose Using American Hustle

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Friday

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The Donnell family once earned twice as much as they do now per year, but they cut back -- by choice -- to focus on what mattered most to them. Clockwise are Gregg, Lola, Kelly and Isabel. Tedd Robbins/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tedd Robbins/NPR

Living In The Middle

Arizona Family Chooses To Live In The Middle

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Thursday

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Darryl and Kristina Pendergrass and their sons, William, 3, and Ian, 20 months. The family gets by on Daryl's $43,000-a-year salary as a biologist with the Alabama Department of Public Health. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliott/NPR

Living In The Middle

Ala. Family Of Four Struggles In Economic Climate

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Wednesday

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Tuesday

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European soldiers are training 2,000 Somalis to help build a national army to defend a weak, Western-backed government in Mogadishu, Somalia. Here, a European soldier participates in the training of a Somali recruit at a training camp in remote Uganda. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Containing Chaos: Somalia Today

Building An Army In Somalia, Teaching It To Fight

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Monday

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African Union troops are trying to bring stability to war-ravaged Somalia. They are locked in battle with al-Shabab, Islamist militants who claim ties with al-Qaida. Here, militiamen in Mogadishu, Somalia's capital, ride in a "technical" -- a pickup truck outfitted with weapons. This militia supports the African Union and local government troops. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Containing Chaos: Somalia Today

Peacekeepers, Islamists Fight For Somalia's Soul

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