Tuesday

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Nevadans vote early at the Meadows Mall in Las Vagas on Thursday. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is locked in a tight race against Republican Sharron Angle, who is backed by the Tea Party. Ethan Miller/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Ethan Miller/Getty

Election 2010

Nevada Voters Confront Stark Choice In Senate Race

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Arizona state Sen. Russell Pearce speaks in April during a vote on SB 1070, the immigration bill he sponsored. The final version resembled "model legislation" he helped draft during an ALEC conference in Washington, D.C., last year. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ross D. Franklin/AP

NPR News Investigations

Shaping State Laws With Little Scrutiny

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Thursday

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Mark Meckler, national coordinator for the Tea Party Patriots, wears a Tea Party pin at a July 21 news conference on Capitol Hill. After the elections, Meckler says, the movement with "really find its stride." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Brandon/AP

Election 2010

What Happens To The Tea Party After Election Day?

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Arizona state Sen. Russell Pearce, pictured here at Tea Party rally on Oct. 22, was instrumental in drafting the state's immigration law. He also sits on a American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) task force, a group that helped shape the law. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joshua Lott/Getty Images

NPR News Investigations

Prison Economics Helped Drive Immigration Law

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Wednesday

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Democratic candidate for governor Jerry Brown (R) speaks as Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (C) Republican gubernatorial candidate Meg  Whitman (2nd-L) look on during a discussion moderated by NBC's Matt Lauer (L) during the Women's Conference 2010 in Long Beach. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Politics

Whitman, Brown In The Hot Seat Over Negative Ads

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Tuesday

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Last month in Des Moines, Iowa, President Obama held a backyard discussion on the economy. With unemployment near 10 percent, the president and his fellow Democrats have had trouble touting positive economic news -- like the lower-than-expected TARP bill. Rodney White/AP/The Des Moines Register hide caption

itoggle caption Rodney White/AP/The Des Moines Register

Election 2010

Democrats Struggle To Make Case On Economy

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Monday

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Friday

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A customer displays his ration card as he waits to buy food at a government store in Havana in 2009. The Cuban government has slowly been chipping away at the rations system — and more changes appear to be coming, worrying many Cubans. Javier Galeano/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Javier Galeano/AP

Latin America

Amid Reforms, Cubans Fret Over Food Rations Fate

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Thursday

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Wednesday

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Abu Adel, originally from Nassariya in southern Iraq, has lived in Kirkuk since the 1980s. He says plainclothed men have harassed him, demanding his papers and asking why he hasn't left Kirkuk. Arabs like Abu Adel, lured north in the 1980s with promises of housing and jobs, are now under intense pressure to move back as Kurds repopulate the area. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Kenyon/NPR

Iraq

In Iraq, Counting Heads Is A Political Headache

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