Thursday

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Sgt. Nathan Scheller was twice denied for a Purple Heart, though roadside bomb explosions left him with lasting cognitive damage. Above, Scheller walks with his wife, Miriam, and his family. NPR/Frontline hide caption

itoggle caption NPR/Frontline

Brain Wars: How The Military Is Failing Its Wounded

Army Clarifies Purple Heart Rules For Soldiers

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Wednesday

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The cooling towers of Three Mile Island's Unit 1 plant pour steam into the sky in Middletown, Pa. In 1979, Three Mile Island's Unit 2 nuclear power plant was the scene of the nation's worst commercial nuclear accident. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP

Rebuilding Japan

A Nuclear-Powered U.S. Still Too Expensive

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Tuesday

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Thursday

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A soldier from the Libyan military's elite Khamis Brigade, led by Moammar Gadhafi's son, takes a position in Harshan, Libya, on Feb. 28. The Khamis Brigade is one of the elite units Gadhafi has bolstered while keeping the regular army weak, analysts say. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ben Curtis/AP

Africa

Gadhafi's Military Muscle Concentrated In Elite Units

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Wednesday

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The FBI used a new DNA fingerprinting technology to analyze the anthrax used in the 2001 mailings. These anthrax spores can live for many years. Janice Haney Carr/CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

itoggle caption Janice Haney Carr/CDC Public Health Image Library

Research News

Lab Vs. Courtroom: Different Definitions Of Proof

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Tuesday

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Scientists use a mesh material as a scaffold to seed bladder cells as they grow. After three to six weeks, the cells are transplanted inside the child's urethra, where they eventually replace the damaged tissue. Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine hide caption

itoggle caption Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Research News

Scientists Grow Parts For Kids With Urinary Damage

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Monday

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David Ross, also known as Waterman Dave, hands out bottled water and energy drinks from his trunk in San Diego. The 75-year-old retiree has made it his mission to help the homeless — even if it's just with a hug or a kind word. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Pam Fessler/NPR

Around the Nation

For San Diego's Homeless, One Man Offers Hope

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Friday

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President Ronald Reagan gestures during a news conference at the White House in January 1986, when he said there was "irrefutable evidence" that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was involved in airport attacks in Rome and Vienna in December 1985. Scott Stewart/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Scott Stewart/AP

History

For Reagan, Gadhafi Was A Frustrating 'Mad Dog'

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Avon Twitty was recently released from a halfway house in Washington, D.C., after serving three years in the Communications Management Unit at the Terre Haute, Ind., prison. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

NPR News Investigations

Leaving 'Guantanamo North,' Inmates Receive Little Help

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