Friday

View show View show

Thursday

View show View show

Wednesday

View show View show

Tuesday

View show View show

Monday

View show

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari speaks in Sri Lanka on Nov. 29. The president has been treated at a hospital in Dubai since Dec. 6. Aides say he is recovering. Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images

Asia

Absent President Ignites Rumors In Pakistan

Listen Loading… 4:42
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/143469532/143562965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
View show

Friday

View show

Cast members of the canceled sitcom Arrested Development reunite at a New Yorker panel in October. Netflix will exclusively stream a new season of the cult hit — and that could bring the service a lot of new subscribers, one analyst says. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The New Yorker hide caption

itoggle caption Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The New Yorker

Business

Online Video Sites Go Pro And Get Original

Listen Loading…
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/143386730/143429326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
View show

Thursday

View show

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says Europe's economic turmoil is the continent's greatest crisis since World War II. But critics say she has been doing too little and lacks a bold vision for solving Europe's problems. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Europe

Can Angela Merkel Fix Europe's Economic Crisis?

Listen Loading… 5:49
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/143292255/143333569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Soldiers of the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry Regiment, E Company, pose for a photograph at Fort Lincoln, Md., one of several fortifications ringing Washington, D.C., during the Civil War. Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Library of Congress

Race

Black Scholar Of The Civil War Asks: Who's With Me?

Listen Loading… 7:48
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/143291199/143333571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
View show

Wednesday

View show

Tall grasses in the San Joaquin valley in California suck carbon dioxide out of the air and store it in the soil. It's one option that environmentalists are pursuing for greenhouse gas "offsets" that can be bought and sold in the state. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Christopher Joyce/NPR

Environment

Can 'Carbon Ranching' Offset Emissions In Calif.?

Listen Loading… 4:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/142947234/143254959" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
View show

Tuesday

View show

Matt Horton is CEO of Propel Fuels, a company that installs equipment and pumps to handle biofuels. Horton says California is a great market because consumers are interested in renewable fuels. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Christopher Joyce/NPR

Environment

Calif. Takes Big Step Toward Greenhouse Gas Limits

Listen Loading… 5:18
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/142942778/143190216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

High school senior Jared Lyons (center), shown here with his parents, Kim and Bob, worries how he'll afford to achieve his dream of becoming a doctor. The economy, he says, "can't get any worse than it is now." Courtesy of Kim Lyons hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Kim Lyons

Hard Times: A Journey Across America

For Mill Town's Youth, 'It Can't Get Any Worse'

Listen Loading… 7:11
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/142618283/143190218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
View show

Monday

View show

Beneath 8,200 feet of water, the Alvin submarine scopes out the Pacific's seafloor in the 1970s. The geologists aboard weren't searching for life — they were on the hunt for hot spots and undersea thermal vents. Courtesy of Kathy Crane hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Kathy Crane

Forgotten Treasures Of Science

The Deep-Sea Find That Changed Biology

Listen Loading… 7:46
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/142678239/143131901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
View show