Tuesday

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Last year, the Annex de Martissant area of Port-au-Prince was a camp for displaced people. The area was filled with tents. Today, locals are building sturdier shelters with funding from the American Red Cross. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Latin America

The Challenge Of Measuring Relief Aid To Haiti

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Monday

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Seventy-three temporary wooden shelters were built last month by the American Red Cross together with other nongovernmental organizations in the Cite Soleil neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. Some residents of the new settlement, Village Carvil, have already added living space with tarps. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Latin America

Two Years After Quake, Many Haitians Await Aid

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Friday

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Compared to many of the dynamic economies in Asia, development is Russia's Far East is limited. Here, men wait for a ferry to take them to Russky Island just off Vladivostok, on Russia's Pacific Coast. In the background, a bridge to the island is being built. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

World

In Russia's Far East, A Frayed Link To Moscow

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Thursday

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The Russian village of Sagra has been in the headlines since last summer, when residents — including 56-year-old Viktor Gorodilov (shown here) — successfully fought off an armed criminal gang that they say threatened their community. For many Russians, Sagra has become a symbol of how they say the government has let them down. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

World

In Russia, Modern 'Revolution' Comes At Its Own Pace

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Wednesday

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Ella Stroganova opens the door at the city museum in Yaroslavl, Russia, where she serves as curator. "Progress makes person absolutely weak," Stroganova said. "He loses his strength because he doesn't need to think how to survive." David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

World

Russia, A Nation Shaped By Tragedy And Hardship

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Tuesday

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Formerly a writer for Moesha and The Jamie Foxx Show, Mara Brock Akil is (with husband Salim Akil) part of the power couple behind BET's hit comic drama The Game. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Television

Mara Brock Akil On Playing 'The Game' In Hollywood

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Monday

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The U.S. is still trying to formulate new policies for the fast-changing politics of the Middle East. Here, Hillary Clinton stands with Libyan fighters who ousted Moammar Gadhafi during an Oct. 18 visit by the U.S. secretary of state to the capital Tripoli. Kevin Lamarque/AFP/Getty Images) hide caption

itoggle caption Kevin Lamarque/AFP/Getty Images)

The Arab Spring: One Year Later

Is The Arab Spring Good Or Bad For The U.S.?

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Friday

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Rick Santorum receives a call at his campaign headquarters during his Senate re-election bid in 2006. The former senator was attempting to keep his Pennsylvania Senate seat, which he later lost to Democrat Bob Casey Jr. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

It's All Politics

Rick Santorum: The Underdog With A Loud Bark

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Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan (right) has been enthusiastically received by Arab Spring countries that look to Turkey as a potential model. Here, Erdogan hosts Mustafa Abdul Jalil, chairman of the National Transitional Council of Libya, in Istanbul, last month. Mustafa Ozer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mustafa Ozer/AFP/Getty Images

The Arab Spring: One Year Later

The Turkish Model: Can It Be Replicated?

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Thursday

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Bahrain is the one Arab country where the government has suppressed a major uprising. Here, protesters wave flags at the Pearl Roundabout in the capital Manama on Feb. 20, 2011, when the demonstrations were at their peak. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

The Arab Spring: One Year Later

Bahrain: The Revolution That Wasn't

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Wednesday

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Syria's embattled President Bashar Assad still has supporters, particularly among his fellow Alawites, a minority who believe they will suffer if Assad is ousted. Here, Assad supporters rally Tuesday in the capital, Damascus. SANA handout/EPA /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption SANA handout/EPA /Landov

The Arab Spring: One Year Later

Syrian Uprising Raises The Specter Of Sectarian War

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