Friday

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Tunisian artist Nadia Jelassi with two of the sculptures from her exhibit that were attacked by a hard-line Muslim group. Secular Tunisians and Islamists have clashed over multiple issues related to freedom of expression. Eleanor Beardsley /NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Eleanor Beardsley /NPR

Africa

Tunisians Battle Over The Meaning Of Free Expression

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Thursday

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Wednesday

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Tuesday

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Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome. Eric Kayne for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Kayne for NPR

Shots - Health News

Doctors Sift Through Patients' Genomes To Solve Medical Mysteries

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Monday

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Friday

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Since leaving Fox News in 2011, Glenn Beck has found his way back to TV. His Internet television network, The Blaze TV, is now available to subscribers of the Dish Network. Kris Connor/Getty Images for Dish Network hide caption

itoggle caption Kris Connor/Getty Images for Dish Network

Media

Smaller Audience, Bigger Payoff For Glenn Beck

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Thursday

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A Libyan follower of Ansar al-Sharia Brigades carries a placard reads in Arabic "our Islamic holies are red line," during a protest in front of the Tibesti Hotel, in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 14, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Mohammad Hannon/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mohammad Hannon/AP

Africa

Libyan Group Denies Role In U.S. Consulate Attack

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Abdul Qadeer Khan, regarded as the father of Pakistan's nuclear bomb, shakes hands with supporters at the Rawalpindi High Court in 2010. The controversial Khan, who sold nuclear secrets to Iran and North Korea, is now entering politics. Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

World

Father Of Pakistan's Nukes Enters Politics

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Wednesday

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An incentive system that gave bonuses to teachers upfront, with the threat of having to give the money back if student performance didn't improve, proved effective in one study. David Franklin/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption David Franklin/iStockphoto.com

Hidden Brain

Do Scores Go Up When Teachers Return Bonuses?

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Watson, now 84, says sequencing helped explain his past sensitivity to certain drugs. But he didn't want to know everything his sequenced genome revealed about his health future. Courtesy of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Shots - Health News

Scientists See Upside And Downside Of Sequencing Their Own Genes

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Tuesday

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Between two farm fields in Sharpsburg, Md., there was a sunken road, which Confederates used as a rifle pit until they were overrun by federal troops. The road has since been known as "Bloody Lane." Library of Congress hide caption

itoggle caption Library of Congress

History

Antietam: A Savage Day In American History

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