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Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen testifies Monday before the commission investigating the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Though Allen was the government's leader of the spill response, he acknowledged it was not always clear to the public who was in charge. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Environment

At Oil Spill Hearing, Calls For New Response Plan

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Bayou Bienvenue in New Orleans is an example of south Louisiana’s wetland loss. Fifty years ago, this was a productive freshwater marsh with cypress and tupelo trees. Today, stumps are all that remain, as saltwater has encroached inland. Debbie Elliot/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliot/NPR

The Disappearing Coast

Louisiana Looks To New Plan To Restore Fragile Coast

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Monday

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Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani, a Tanzanian, is accused of helping to carry out embassy bombings in East Africa in 1998 that killed 224 people and injured hundreds more. U.S. District Attorney's Office hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. District Attorney's Office

Around the Nation

Guantanamo Detainee's Trial May Set Tone For Others

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Friday

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Tuesday

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Monday

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Haji Gul Nazim shows how he was able to wash off voter registration ink from his finger. To vote in Afghanistan, each voter presents and identification card and dips his finger in a bottle of indelible ink. If the ink washes off, voters might then be able to vote again -- using bogus identification cards. Jim Wildman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Wildman/NPR

The Two-Way

Afghan Election Not A Sign Of The Government's Sustainability

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Friday

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