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Live in Studio 4A
Our showcase for artists invited to perform on the program and talk about their music
The PT 50
Our list of 50 essential classical CDs
Piano Puzzlers
Bruce Adolphe's "name that composer" piano quiz
 
 
 
Moses Hogan 1957 - 2003
Moses Hogan Acclaimed pianist, conductor and arranger Moses Hogan died on February 11, 2003, at age 46. Hogan founded and directed the New Orleans-based Moses Hogan Chorale, renowned for its powerful interpretations of African-American spirituals.

Hogan became one of the most influential names in modern choral singing by rejuvenating the genre of African-American spirituals for both choral singers and audiences. Hogan went on to edit the new Oxford Book of Spirituals (2001), considered to be the first comprehensive anthology of the art form, with examples ranging from early-20th century composers Hall Johnson and Harry Burleigh, to modern arrangers such as Jester Hairston and Moses Hogan.

Dr. Anton Armstrong, director of the St. Olaf Choir, reflects on his friend and colleague:

Hogan revitalizes the spiritual

Why the spiritual is universally loved

Hogan's gift to the St. Olaf Choir


In Depth

Arr. Hogan: "This Little Light of Mine" and Arr. Dawson: "In His Care-O"
The St. Olaf Choir performs spirituals in Studio 4A, including Moses Hogan's arrangement for the St. Olaf Choir of "This Little Light of Mine" (more)

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