NPR

| Back to npr.org

spacer logo top header curve header
logo left logo right
The Glory and Future of Peru's Manu Rainforest

audio icon Listen to part one audio icon Listen to part two

January 24 - 25, 2000 -- Tropical reserves around the world are increasingly degraded by logging, hunting and oil drilling. But in the lowland rainforests of Peru, the Manu reserve remains pristine. Listen as NPR's John Nielsen begins a two-part NPR/National Geographic Society Radio Expeditions up one of the rivers leading into the park. He visits a famous tropical biologist, sees fierce animals, and watches an indigenous hunter practice with his bow and arrow.

The Manu Nature reserve in Peru is said to be a world epicenter of biodiversity. But every year, more people are born inside the boundaries of the park, and some of these people say it's time they were allowed to farm land and hunt with guns. Listen to the second of a two-part NPR/National Geographic Society Radio Expeditions to Peru, as NPR's John Nielsen visits an indigenous village, talks with concerned scientists, and visits an Eco-tourism site that may help save this park.

A tributary of Peru's Manu River A tributary of Peru's Manu River

NPR correspondent John Nielsen and fellow travelers on the Manu River NPR correspondent John Nielsen and fellow travelers on the Manu River



bottom curve left spacer bottom curve right