Talk of the Nation Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and health care, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians and artists from around the world.

Previous Shows

Talk of the Nation for September 30, 2011

Talk of the Nation for September 29, 2011

Dmitry Samarov began driving a cab in 1993 to help supplement his work as an artist. Daniel Kirwin hide caption

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Daniel Kirwin

A 'Hack' Shares Years Of Stories From A Chicago Cab

A 'Hack' Shares Years Of Stories From A Chicago Cab

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Talk of the Nation for September 28, 2011

Iraqi-American activist and musician Stephan Said's music melds hip-hop, rock, folk and Arabic influences. Aaron Fedor hide caption

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Aaron Fedor

Stephan Said Sings The American Dream

Stephan Said Sings The American Dream

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Talk of the Nation for September 27, 2011

It's a given that professional athletes need regular coaching to keep them at the top of their game. Why then, asks surgeon Atul Gawande, shouldn't doctors and teachers use coaches? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Athletes Have Coaches. Why Not Everyone Else?

Athletes Have Coaches. Why Not Everyone Else?

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Talk of the Nation for September 26, 2011

Navigating high school is a challenge for most kids. But for the refugee and immigrant students enrolled at Brooklyn's International High School, it can be even harder to learn the ins and outs of American teen life. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

New York High School Helps Immigrant 'Kids' Adapt

New York High School Helps Immigrant 'Kids' Adapt

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