TED Radio Hour In this episode, TED speakers describe how all forms of amusement — from tossing a ball to video games — can make us smarter, saner and more collaborative. (Original broadcast date: March 27, 2015)

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What happens when we play?

What happens when we play?

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In this episode, TED speakers describe how all forms of amusement — from tossing a ball to video games — can make us smarter, saner and more collaborative. (Original broadcast date: March 27, 2015)

Research finds playing a collaborative video game like Rock Band makes you more comfortable with strangers. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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How Can Playing A Game Make You More Empathetic?

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The group Improv Everywhere brings moments of spontaneous fun into the everyday. Courtesy of Charlie Todd hide caption

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Courtesy of Charlie Todd

Who's That Guy Riding The Subway In His Underwear?

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Power Pill (Aphex Twin)

Primatologist Isabel Behncke Izquierdo says play helps to foster creativity, trust, and cooperation. James Duncan Davidson/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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What Can Bonobos Teach Us About Play?

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Super Mario Brothers Theme London Philharmonic
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Game designer Jane McGonigal says we need to harness the beneficial aspects of video games. James Duncan Davidson/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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How Can Video Games Improve Our Real Lives?

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Video Games Robbie Jones

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