Thursday

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Cleopatra Pendleton (left) is consoled by her sister Kimiko Pettis on Jan. 30. Charles Rex Arbogast /AP hide caption

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Wednesday

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Tuesday

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Monday

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Music

Grammy Awards: Winners, Losers & Wardrobe Risks

fun. won at the 2013 Grammy Awards. The indie rock trio earned trophies for Song of the Year and Best New Artist. Host Michel Martin discusses who else scored awards, who was slighted, and which star showed the most skin, despite the ban on risqué clothing.

Grammy Awards: Winners, Losers & Wardrobe Risks

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Friday

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Barbershop

Should Christie Lighten Up Over Doctor's Concern?

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie isn't laughing about his weight anymore. After poking fun at himself earlier this week, he ended up telling a former White House doctor to "shut up," when she commented on his size. Did he overreact? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

Should Christie Lighten Up Over Doctor's Concern?

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Thursday

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Economy

Stocks Climbing But Is Your Bank Account?

Bloomberg Businessweek contributor Roben Farzad speaks with Michel Martin about recent gains in the housing and stock markets. That might be great for wealthier Americans, but Farzad explains why people with lower incomes are not reaping the benefits.

Stocks Climbing But Is Your Bank Account?

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Music

Mixing Blues and the Nakota Nation In Music

When guitarist Mato Nanji made backstage conversation about the history of his tribe, the Nakota nation, he didn't expect his comments to inspire trance bluesman Otis Taylor. Host Michel Martin speaks to the two musicians behind the new album 'My World is Gone.'

Mixing Blues and the Nakota Nation In Music

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Wednesday

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Economy

The Squeeze: Higher Costs And Smaller Paychecks

The economy may be on the rebound, but life is getting tougher for some people in the middle class. With rising gas prices, insurance costs, and higher payroll taxes, people are feeling squeezed. Host Michel Martin asks if there's any financial relief in sight.

The Squeeze: Higher Costs And Smaller Paychecks

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Beauty Shop

Does Having Guns Make Women Safer?

Many policymakers who oppose tighter gun laws have said gun ownership is important to women's safety. The writers and journalists of the 'Beauty Shop' share their thoughts on the role gender plays in the gun debate.

Does Having Guns Make Women Safer?

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fifteen-year-old Malala Yousefzai relaxes. The Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban on Oct. 9 2012 has made her first video statement since she was nearly killed, released Monday, saying she is recovering. Courtesy of Malala Yousefzai/AP hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Malala Yousefzai/AP
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Tuesday

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Politics

Overhauling Immigration: Asians Matter Too

The national conversation about overhauling immigration often focuses on Latino immigrants. But what works for one ethnic group may not be ideal for all. Host Michel Martin finds out what Asian immigrants want most from immigration reform.

Overhauling Immigration: Asians Matter Too

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Monday

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Barrington Irving , a 23-year-old Jamaican-born pilot, at a news conference at Opa-locka Airport Wednesday, June 27, 2007, ending a three-month journey he said would make him the youngest person to fly around the world alone. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Education

African Americans Fly High With Math And Science

At the age of 23 and with only $30 in his pocket, Barrington Irving became the youngest person to fly around the world. Host Michel Martin talks to Irving about getting kids on board with math and science from a 'flying classroom.'

African Americans Fly High With Math And Science

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Singer Angelique Kidjo of Benin performs during the opening concert for the soccer World Cup at Orlando stadium in Soweto, South Africa, June 10, 2010. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Friday

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Economy

Can A Housing Comeback Save Lagging Job Numbers?

The winter may not be over, but economists are looking to spring for good news when it comes to jobs. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax about whether a strengthening housing market could boost stalling jobs numbers.

Can A Housing Comeback Save Lagging Job Numbers?

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BackTalk

Emeli Sande Feels America's 'Kind Of Love'

Host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar open up the listener inbox. They discuss musician Emeli Sande's rise in the U.S. charts, and get feedback about an interview on mental illness and gun violence.

Emeli Sande Feels America's 'Kind Of Love'

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