Friday

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Faith Matters

Orthodox Jews Gear Up For First Women Leaders

Breaking the norms of faith isn't always easy — especially for Orthodox Jews. But Ruth Balinsky Friedman wants to take up the traditionally male-dominated role of faith leader. She speaks with host Michel Martin about what a woman can bring to the position.

Orthodox Jews Gear Up For First Women Leaders

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Barbershop

Kanye: 'Complete Awesomeness' Or Completely Overrated?

Rapper Kanye West drops a new album next week. But a New York Times interview has left some people asking whether the self-proclaimed 'Louis Vuitton Don' is a musical genius, a bizarre narcissist, or a bit of both? Host Michel Martin checks-in with the Barbershop guys.

Kanye: 'Complete Awesomeness' Or Completely Overrated?

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Thursday

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National Security

Hacktivists: Heroes Or, Well, Hacks?

NSA leaker Eric Snowden and the people behind Wikileaks are being called 'hacktivists' for their activities. Host Michel Martin speaks with digital activism expert Gabriella Coleman, and Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen about 'hacktivists.'

Hacktivists: Heroes Or, Well, Hacks?

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Politics

Is Immigration Reform Really Going Anywhere?

A bipartisan immigration bill made it to the Senate floor this week. Hundreds of amendments have already been considered, and many more will probably crop up. Host Michel Martin looks at some of the more interesting and controversial provisions.

Is Immigration Reform Really Going Anywhere?

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World

Mau Mau Settlement: How Much Cash Fixes The Past?

The British government recently reached a settlement with Kenyans who were tortured during colonial rule. Host Michel Martin speaks with Harvard professor Caroline Elkins about the atrocities, and how she uncovered them.

Mau Mau Settlement: How Much Cash Fixes The Past?

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Buika blends flamenco with African rhythms, jazz, blues and soul. Javi Rojo hide caption

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Wednesday

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History

50 Years Of Remembering Medgar Evers, His Widow Reflects

Fifty years ago, civil rights leader Medgar Evers was shot and killed outside his home in Mississippi. Host Michel Martin speaks with his widow, Myrlie Evers-Williams, about how she remembers him and keeps his legacy alive today.

50 Years Of Remembering Medgar Evers, His Widow Reflects

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Oswald Boateng has designed for the rich and famous. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Art & Design

British Designer Ozwald Boateng's Dream To Dress Africa

Boateng became the first black designer on London's prestigious Savile Row. Since then, he's made quite the name for himself; his tailored suits cost as much as $40,000. Host Michel Martin speaks with Ozwald about his career, style and Ghanaian heritage.

British Designer Ozwald Boateng's Dream To Dress Africa

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Can I Just Tell You?

Want To Know Something? Just Ask

Host Michel Martin says people too often base their 'facts' on assumptions — not real data. She shares her thoughts on new polling numbers in her regular 'Can I Just Tell You' essay.

Want To Know Something? Just Ask

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Tuesday

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Money Coach

Interest Rates Up: Could Spell Uncertainty For Home Loans, Retirement

Interest rates have shot up recently, and if the rise continues, it could affect everything from home loans to retirement plans. Host Michel Martin speaks with Roben Farzad of Bloomberg Businessweek about whether you should do anything to prepare, if rates continue to climb.

Interest Rates Up: Could Spell Uncertainty For Home Loans, Retirement

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Monday

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A couple taking in the moment at the San Tan Valley Desert in Arizona. Tammy Watson hide caption

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Friday

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Ballerinas at practice John H. White hide caption

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Barbershop

Is It A Surprise That The Government Is Monitoring Your Calls?

The White House says the NSA needs to collect citizens' phone records to protect the country from terrorist threats. But is it in our best interests or just another example of Big Brother? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

Is It A Surprise That The Government Is Monitoring Your Calls?

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Thursday

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Race

Coming Out As Black, When You Were Hispanic

Teen Elaine Vilorio spent years trying to make sense of her racial identity. She describes herself as Hispanic, but other people see her as black. Vilorio speaks to guest host Celeste Headlee about her recent HuffPost Teen blog, 'Coming Out As Black.'

Coming Out As Black, When You Were Hispanic

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Chef Roblé Ali prepares crabs for an event with singer-songwriter John Legend. Bravo/Heidi Gutman hide caption

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Christian McBride. Chi Modu/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Wednesday

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Business

Hollywood Wants A Piece Of The Action In China's Movie Market

Box office receipts in China reached new highs last year, and American filmmakers want to tap into that market. Host Michel Martin speaks with Los Angeles Times reporter John Horn, about the growth of the Chinese movie market, and how Hollywood plans to cash in.

Hollywood Wants A Piece Of The Action In China's Movie Market

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The Bunker brothers with some members of their family. Courtesy of Surry Arts Council hide caption

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Asia

Why Are Americans Afraid Of China?

From business to culture, Bruce Pickering of the Asia Society speaks to host Michel Martin about China's growing influence, and offers perspective about whether some Americans' fears about China's role in the country are founded.

Why Are Americans Afraid Of China?

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Tuesday

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Monday

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Law

Pick 'Em Up, Lock 'Em Up: Getting Tough On Gangs

Illinois Senator Mark Kirk recently suggested that federal agents arrest tens of thousands of Chicago gang members. But would that tactic work? Host Michel Martin asks Illinois Congressman Danny Davis, former federal prosecutor Ron Safer, and reporter Rob Wildeboer.

Pick 'Em Up, Lock 'Em Up: Getting Tough On Gangs

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Law

Pick 'Em Up, Lock 'Em Up: Getting Tough On Gangs II

Host Michel Martin continues her conversation about a new proposal to crack down on Chicago gangs with Illinois Congressman Danny Davis, former federal prosecutor Ron Safer, and criminal justice reporter Rob Wildeboer.

Pick 'Em Up, Lock 'Em Up: Getting Tough On Gangs II

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Television

Cheerios Commercial Leaves Bitter Taste

A recent Cheerios television ad featuring an interracial family led to some ugly racial comments online. Host Michel Martin and Michael Burgi of Adweek discuss what the reaction says about marketing to minorities.

Cheerios Commercial Leaves Bitter Taste

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