Friday

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Politics

What's Making Headlines Outside Of Washington?

Congress has gone home for its annual August recess, so Tell Me More takes a look at headlines in places across the country. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Mike Leary from the San Antonio Express-News and Dana Coffield of The Denver Post.

What's Making Headlines Outside Of Washington?

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Faith Matters

Why Do Sikhs Want To Serve In The Military?

Sikhs have a long history of fighting in wars. But in the US, their turbans and beards often prevent them from being able to join the military. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Major Kamaljit Kalsi who's hoping to change that.

Why Do Sikhs Want To Serve In The Military?

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BackTalk

Mali's Challenger Concedes, As Zimbabwe Fights Election Results

Guest host Celeste Headlee and editor Ammad Omar crack open the inbox for listener feedback and story updates. This week, they discuss recent elections in Africa.

Mali's Challenger Concedes, As Zimbabwe Fights Election Results

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Barbershop

Could Prison Spell The End Of The Jackson Dynasty?

Former congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. was sentenced to prison for illegal use of campaign funds. Is this the end of the Jackson legacy or could he make a comeback? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

Could Prison Spell The End Of The Jackson Dynasty?

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Thursday

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World

Is Democracy Finished In Egypt?

Hundreds of people are dead and thousands more are injured after the military started cracking down on supporters of ousted President Mohammad Morsi. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about Egypt's future with Shadi Hamid of the Brookings Doha Center.

Is Democracy Finished In Egypt?

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Andrea Stuart is also the author of The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon's Josephine. Clara Molden/Camera Press Redux hide caption

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Books

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

Through years of careful research, author Andrea Stuart discovered that her bloodline includes both slaves and slave owners. In her book Sugar in the Blood, she writes about her own family, and about the history of slavery in the Caribbean.

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

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Music

Summer Songs: Clarinetist Remakes 50 Cent

Tell Me More's 'Summer Songs' series samples contemporary artists who have remade old classics. This week, Gwen Thompkins, host of WWNO's Music Inside Out, shares a clarinetist's re-interpretation of 50 Cent's song, 'P.I.M.P.'

Summer Songs: Clarinetist Remakes 50 Cent

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Wednesday

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Law

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

Princeton sociology professor Douglas Massey tells guest host Celeste Headlee that many of the policies intended to stop undocumented immigration not only failed, but actually kept migrants from returning to their home countries.

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

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Montreux Rotholtz/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Books

'Happiness, Like Water' Based On Nigerian-American Writer's Reality

Born in Nigeria, Chinelo Okparanta was raised in the U.S. by her parents who were Jehovah's Witnesses. She talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about writing the truth about her home country, even if it's an ugly truth.

'Happiness, Like Water' Based On Nigerian-American Writer's Reality

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Johnny Linton, a music student, performs at the Gateways Music Festival's Youth Showcase Concert Jim Hunter/Gateways Music Festival hide caption

toggle caption Jim Hunter/Gateways Music Festival

Music

African-American Musicians, More Than Just Jazz

Jazz may be the first thing that comes to mind when we think of the contributions African-Americans have made to music. But the Gateways Musical Festival highlights African-Americans' classical past.

African-American Musicians, More Than Just Jazz

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Tuesday

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Law

Stop-And-Frisk: Smart Policing Or Violation Of Rights?

A federal judge says New York City's stop-and-frisk policies have violated the rights of thousands of people. Guest Host Celeste Headlee discusses the ruling with Scott Burns of the National District Attorneys Association and criminal justice professor Delores Jones-Brown.

Stop-And-Frisk: Smart Policing Or Violation Of Rights?

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Law

Stop-And-Frisk: 'I Remember Feeling Helpless'

Nicholas Peart was a plaintiff in a New York City stop-and-frisk lawsuit. He spoke with the StoryCorps project about being stopped and frisked by the police, while he was out celebrating his 18th birthday.

Stop-And-Frisk: 'I Remember Feeling Helpless'

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Monday

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On Aging

Are We Ready For A Massive Aging Population?

America's population is aging at a rapid rate: 20 percent of the country will be 65 or older by the year 2050. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with experts about how the aging population will affect the American landscape.

Are We Ready For A Massive Aging Population?

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Art & Design

Powwow Party Flub Leads To Fashion Line

When the design company Paul Frank threw a powwow themed party, a lot of people were offended. But rather than just issue an apology, the company teamed up with Native American designers for a new line. Guest host Celeste Headlee finds out more.

Powwow Party Flub Leads To Fashion Line

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Friday

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Barbershop

Maj. Nidal Hasan: A Murderer or Martyr ?

The Barbershop guys talk about the trial of Major Nidal Hasan. He's on trial for a mass shooting at an Army base in 2009 and decided to represent himself. Some have wondered whether that is a wise move. The Barbershop guys weigh in.

Maj. Nidal Hasan: A Murderer or Martyr ?

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Forest Whitaker stars in The Butler, loosely based on the life of Eugene Allen. Anne Marie Fox/The Weinsten Co. hide caption

toggle caption Anne Marie Fox/The Weinsten Co.
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Thursday

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Sports

Dominican Players And PED Use: Coincidence?

More than half of the Major League Baseball players recently suspended for performance enhancing drug use are from the Dominican Republic - where many PED's are available over-the-counter. Host Michel Martin finds out more.

Dominican Players And PED Use: Coincidence?

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Legendary filmmaker Spike Lee is using the website Kickstarter to raise money for his latest project. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Wisdom Watch

Spike Lee: Doing The Right Thing For Himself

The legendary filmmaker is using the fundraising website Kickstarter to raise money for his latest movie — and he's drawing some criticism for it. He talks to host Michel Martin about funding his own films and the state of the industry today.

Spike Lee: Doing The Right Thing For Himself

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Books

Author Tells of Trinidad's Beauty And Grit

Tell Me More's summer reading series highlights authors from the Caribbean. Host Michel Martin talks to Oonya Kempadoo, whose novel All Decent Animals, gives readers look into life in Trinidad that is both lovely and tough.

Author Tells of Trinidad's Beauty And Grit

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Music

Summer Songs: New Music Takes On Old Favorites

Tell Me More is looking at contemporary artists remaking old classics for its 'Summer Songs' series. Gwen Thompkins, the host of WWNO's Music Inside Out, shares a piano medley by Allen Toussaint, in which he reinterprets three jazz greats.

Summer Songs: New Music Takes On Old Favorites

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Wednesday

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Race

Are Lower School Achievement Levels A Civil Rights Issue?

Does setting lower achievement levels for minorities help or hurt students? Host Michel Martin talks with Jerri Katzerman of the Southern Poverty Law Center. The organization recently filed a civil rights complaint against the Florida Department of Education.

Are Lower School Achievement Levels A Civil Rights Issue?

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Laverne Cox plays Sophia in the new Netflix original series Orange Is the New Black. Netflix hide caption

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Tuesday

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Education

Brother Wants Parents To Stop Siblings' Homeschooling

College student Josh Powell says he had huge gaps in his education from being homeschooled. Now, he's advocating for his siblings to attend public school, despite a religious exception given to his family. Host Michel Martin talks to Powell about his experience.

Brother Wants Parents To Stop Siblings' Homeschooling

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Parenting

Parents On The Pros And Cons Of Homeschooling

Many people laud the benefits of homeschooling. But the practice also has critics. Host Michel Martin talks with a group of parents about their personal experiences: homeschooling advocate Michael Farris, dad Paul Hagen and mom Shawn Spence.

Parents On The Pros And Cons Of Homeschooling

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Monday

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Politics

Lack of Leadership Causing US Defense Issues Abroad?

A terror threat closes American embassies, and changes the political debate about intelligence gathering. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie, and former Obama administration advisor Corey Ealons.

Lack of Leadership Causing US Defense Issues Abroad?

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Religion

Sikh Says No Room For Hate, A Year After Temple Shooting

One year ago today, a gunman killed six people at a Sikh temple before turning the gun on himself. Host Michel Martin talks to a member of the temple, Mandeep Kaur, about how Sikhs have turned to their faith to recover.

Sikh Says No Room For Hate, A Year After Temple Shooting

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Sports

NFL: Is The Game Getting Safer?

As fans and teams get ready for another season of football, a new study sheds light on game safety. Host Michel Martin talks with Jesse David of Edgeworth Economics about whether efforts to cut down on serious injuries are getting results.

NFL: Is The Game Getting Safer?

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Remembrances

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

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Music

Singer Alice Smith: 'I've Always Been Myself'

Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Alice Smith has managed to keep her music unique, despite pressure from music labels. She joins host Michel Martin for a special performance chat of her latest album She.

Singer Alice Smith: 'I've Always Been Myself'

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