Tuesday

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Economy

Economic Recovery: Women Bouncing Back Quicker Than Men?

New figures show women have more jobs in the U.S. than ever before - but men are still struggling to pull out of the recession. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax, and Ariane Hegewisch from the Institute for Women's Policy Research.

Economic Recovery: Women Bouncing Back Quicker Than Men?

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World

Dominican Republic Official Defends Citizenship Ruling

The Dominican Republic is questioning the citizenship of thousands of Haitians who moved there in the 1930s and their children. Host Michel Martin talks with Leonel Mateo, from the Dominican embassy in Washington D.C., about the controversial ruling.

Dominican Republic Official Defends Citizenship Ruling

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Books

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

When slavery was outlawed in the Caribbean, indentured servitude took over. Host Michel Martin speaks with author Gauitra Bahadur. Her book Coolie Woman traces her great-grandmother's roots from India to Guyana.

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

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Parenting

China Eases One Child Policy, What's Next?

After more than three decades, China announced it will ease its one child policy. For more on how the change affects families and the economy, host Michel Martin speaks with writer Jiayang Fan, dad David Youtz and Howard University professor Meirong Liu.

China Eases One Child Policy, What's Next?

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Monday

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Television

'Totally Biased' TV Show Canceled, A Total Loss?

Comedian W. Kamau Bell's cable talk show Totally Biased earned a lot of buzz, but was recently canceled. NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans tells host Michel Martin why, and sheds some light on the television industry.

'Totally Biased' TV Show Canceled, A Total Loss?

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Friday

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Thursday

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Around the Nation

Radio Diaries 'Made Me Feel Important'

Radio Diaries has helped people record and tell their own stories for more than a decade. Host Michel Martin speaks with Melissa Rodriguez, a single mom who recorded her "teen diary" 16 years ago, and again this year.

Radio Diaries 'Made Me Feel Important'

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Terrence Howard, Nia Long and Eddie Cibrian in The Best Man Holiday. Michael Gibson/AP/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Music

Chrisette Michele's Music To Make Her Days Better

Grammy-winning R&B musician Chrisette Michele spoke with Tell Me More earlier this year about her latest album Better. For Tell More's occasional segment "In Your Ear," she talks about the songs in rotation on her playlist.

Chrisette Michele's Music To Make Her Days Better

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Wednesday

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World

Typhoon Haiyan: Families Struggle To Connect Amid Devastation

Wrecked infrastructure is making it hard for Filipino Americans to find out the status of family members affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jessica Petilla, a Filipino doctor in New York who has immediate family in the hard hit province of Leyte.

Typhoon Haiyan: Families Struggle To Connect Amid Devastation

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Around the Nation

Peace First Prize Encourages Youth To Seek Change

The group Peace First is handing out $50,000 in prizes to young people who promote peace in their communities. Host Michel Martin speaks with Eric Dawson, the co-founder and president of Peace First, and recipient Babatunde Salaam.

Peace First Prize Encourages Youth To Seek Change

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Tuesday

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World

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are being stripped of their citizenship by that country. Host Michel Martin talks to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about why Dominicans of Haitian ancestry are denouncing the decision.

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

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World

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

Fifteen countries in the Caribbean are seeking reparations from their former colonial masters for the lasting harm slavery has had on their countries. Host Michel Martin talks about the effort with Jermaine McCalpin from the University of West Indies in Jamaica.

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

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A Washington Redskins fan watches the game in Landover, Md. Nick Wass/AP hide caption

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Monday

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Two female Marines carry a mock wounded person as they participate in a drill at Camp Lejeune, N.C. They were among the first female participants to receive this training after the military lifted its ban on women serving in combat roles. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Code Switch

Navigating Military Service, Parenting And The Brass Ceiling

Being a woman in the service has its rewards, and it has its challenges. Two female veterans turned authors have new books they hope will reach those who might follow in their boot steps.

Navigating Military Service, Parenting And The Brass Ceiling

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Colin Woodard's map of the "11 nations." Colin Woodard hide caption

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U.S.

Forget The 50 States; The U.S. Is Really 11 Nations, Author Says

Author Colin Woodard says it's better to think of the U.S. as 11 distinct nations instead of 50 states. He speaks with Tell Me More about how those nations came about, and why they play a role in everything from gun control to tax policy.

Forget The 50 States; The U.S. Is Really 11 Nations, Author Says

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Books

Africana Book Awards: There's More To Africa Than Animals

The Africana Book Awards are supposed to encourage the publication of accurate, balanced children's literature about Africa. Guest host Celeste Headleee speaks to award winners Karen Leggett Abouraya and Ifeoma Onyefulu.

Africana Book Awards: There's More To Africa Than Animals

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Friday

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Education

Getting To The Root Of The Problems In School Districts

Host Michel Martin continues the conversation surrounding Missouri's controversial school transfer policy with Don Marsh of St. Louis Public Radio; Ty McNichols, who leads the city's Normandy School District; and Eric Knost, Superintendent of Mehlville School District.

Getting To The Root Of The Problems In School Districts

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Barbershop

Should Jonathan Martin 'Man Up' Or 'Leave It On The Field?'

The Barbershop guys meet us in St. Louis this week. They'll weigh in on the Miami Dolphins' bullying debate, and ask whether a California high school's mascot is offensive.

Should Jonathan Martin 'Man Up' Or 'Leave It On The Field?'

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Thursday

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Africa

Congolese Rebels Put Down Arms, But Will Another Group Rise Up?

The Congolese rebel group M-23 is has been condemned for its years of brutal violence against civilians. But now, they've vowed to lay down their weapons. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the issue with NPR's Eastern Africa correspondent Gregory Warner.

Congolese Rebels Put Down Arms, But Will Another Group Rise Up?

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Wednesday

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Politics

Detroit Mayor 'Asked To Save City While Holding Kryptonite'

Election results in Virginia, New York, Detroit, and New Jersey are getting national attention. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving, and Jerome Vaughn of Detroit's NPR member station WDET, to talk about Tuesday's winners and losers.

Detroit Mayor 'Asked To Save City While Holding Kryptonite'

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Texas Tangled In Hair Braiding Controversy

For women, hair care can be a sensitive issue. But now one woman is picking a fight over hair care with the state of Texas. Host Michel Martin speaks with Isis Brantley who is suing the state for the right to teach hair braiding.

Texas Tangled In Hair Braiding Controversy

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Kerry Washington hosted Saturday Night Live this past weekend following controversy about the show's lack of a diverse cast. Dana Edelson/Courtesy of NBC hide caption

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Code Switch

Comediennes Of Color: 'I Am Funny'

Two comediennes of color, Anjelah Johnson, and Debra Wilson, both formerly of Fox's sketch comedy series MADtv, spoke with Tell Me More host, Michel Martin about the discussion on the lack of diversity at Saturday Night Live.

Comediennes Of Color: 'I Am Funny'

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Toronto Mayor Rob Ford talks on his weekly radio show in Toronto, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Mark Blinch/AP/The Candian Press hide caption

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News

Disgust Or Pity For Crack-Smoking Toronto Mayor?

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford's use of crack has embarrassed the city he serves and made his name into a punch line. In her "Can I Just Tell You" essay, host Michel Martin looks beyond the jokes, to what Ford's situation says about addiction.

Disgust Or Pity For Crack-Smoking Toronto Mayor?

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