Monday

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Education

Reporters' Notebook: Philadelphia, A Laboratory For Hybrid Schools

Michel Martin talks with NPR education correspondents Claudio Sanchez and Eric Westervelt, about a new NPR series looking at problems within Philadelphia's public school system, and the lessons the rest of the country can take from Philly.

Reporters' Notebook: Philadelphia, A Laboratory For Hybrid Schools

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Idris Elba (as Nelson Mandela) and Naomie Harris (as Winnie Mandela) in a scene from his trial. Keith Bernstein/The Weinstein Company hide caption

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Movie Interviews

Winnie: Not 'Just The Woman Who Stood By Mandela's Side'

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom is the latest biopic about former South African president Nelson Mandela. Host Michel Martin speaks to Naomi Harris who plays his former wife, Winnie, in the film.

Winnie: Not 'Just The Woman Who Stood By Mandela's Side'

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Friday

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World

Do Sanctions Really Work?

Foreign leaders are gathered in Geneva, trying to come up with a plan to ease sanctions on Iran, in exchange for promises about their nuclear program. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks NPR's Tom Gjelten about when sanctions work, and why they sometimes don't.

Do Sanctions Really Work?

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Grammy Award-winner Esperanza Spalding in her video 'We Are America." ESPLLC hide caption

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Music Interviews

Esperanza Spalding: Guantanamo Doesn't Represent 'Our America'

The Grammy-winning musician's new recording, "We Are America," protests the controversial detention center. But she tells NPR she doesn't like to call it a protest song. It's more of a "let's get together and do something pro-active, creative and productive" song.

Esperanza Spalding: Guantanamo Doesn't Represent 'Our America'

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Thursday

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On Disabilities

Autistic Kids At Risk Of Wandering: How To Keep Them Safe

The case of a missing teenager in New York has sparked a national conversation about keeping autistic children safe. Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from the National Autism Association's Lori McIlwain.

Autistic Kids At Risk Of Wandering: How To Keep Them Safe

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A potluck featuring Sunny Corn Muffins, Tanka Bite Bread, squash with Garlic-roasted Cranberries, and Black and Blue Bison Stew. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Music

Author Anton Treuer On Native American Tunes

Anton Treuer is the author of the book Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid To Ask. During this Native American Heritage Month, he recommends some tunes for Tell Me More's 'In Your Ear' series.

Author Anton Treuer On Native American Tunes

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Wednesday

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Adrian Miller talks about why he spent a decade researching soul food. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Digital Life

Selfies: The World Is More Interesting Because I'm In It

"Selfie" is the new word of the year, chosen by Oxford Dictionaries. Tell Me More and NPR's Social Media Project Manager Kate Myers talk about why people love sharing "selfies."

Selfies: The World Is More Interesting Because I'm In It

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Tuesday

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Economy

Economic Recovery: Women Bouncing Back Quicker Than Men?

New figures show women have more jobs in the U.S. than ever before - but men are still struggling to pull out of the recession. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax, and Ariane Hegewisch from the Institute for Women's Policy Research.

Economic Recovery: Women Bouncing Back Quicker Than Men?

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World

Dominican Republic Official Defends Citizenship Ruling

The Dominican Republic is questioning the citizenship of thousands of Haitians who moved there in the 1930s and their children. Host Michel Martin talks with Leonel Mateo, from the Dominican embassy in Washington D.C., about the controversial ruling.

Dominican Republic Official Defends Citizenship Ruling

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Books

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

When slavery was outlawed in the Caribbean, indentured servitude took over. Host Michel Martin speaks with author Gauitra Bahadur. Her book Coolie Woman traces her great-grandmother's roots from India to Guyana.

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

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Parenting

China Eases One Child Policy, What's Next?

After more than three decades, China announced it will ease its one child policy. For more on how the change affects families and the economy, host Michel Martin speaks with writer Jiayang Fan, dad David Youtz and Howard University professor Meirong Liu.

China Eases One Child Policy, What's Next?

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Monday

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Television

'Totally Biased' TV Show Canceled, A Total Loss?

Comedian W. Kamau Bell's cable talk show Totally Biased earned a lot of buzz, but was recently canceled. NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans tells host Michel Martin why, and sheds some light on the television industry.

'Totally Biased' TV Show Canceled, A Total Loss?

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Friday

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Thursday

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Around the Nation

Radio Diaries 'Made Me Feel Important'

Radio Diaries has helped people record and tell their own stories for more than a decade. Host Michel Martin speaks with Melissa Rodriguez, a single mom who recorded her "teen diary" 16 years ago, and again this year.

Radio Diaries 'Made Me Feel Important'

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Terrence Howard, Nia Long and Eddie Cibrian in The Best Man Holiday. Michael Gibson/AP/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Music

Chrisette Michele's Music To Make Her Days Better

Grammy-winning R&B musician Chrisette Michele spoke with Tell Me More earlier this year about her latest album Better. For Tell More's occasional segment "In Your Ear," she talks about the songs in rotation on her playlist.

Chrisette Michele's Music To Make Her Days Better

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Wednesday

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World

Typhoon Haiyan: Families Struggle To Connect Amid Devastation

Wrecked infrastructure is making it hard for Filipino Americans to find out the status of family members affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jessica Petilla, a Filipino doctor in New York who has immediate family in the hard hit province of Leyte.

Typhoon Haiyan: Families Struggle To Connect Amid Devastation

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Around the Nation

Peace First Prize Encourages Youth To Seek Change

The group Peace First is handing out $50,000 in prizes to young people who promote peace in their communities. Host Michel Martin speaks with Eric Dawson, the co-founder and president of Peace First, and recipient Babatunde Salaam.

Peace First Prize Encourages Youth To Seek Change

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Race influences most people's online dating preferences. iStock hide caption

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Tuesday

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World

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are being stripped of their citizenship by that country. Host Michel Martin talks to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about why Dominicans of Haitian ancestry are denouncing the decision.

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

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World

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

Fifteen countries in the Caribbean are seeking reparations from their former colonial masters for the lasting harm slavery has had on their countries. Host Michel Martin talks about the effort with Jermaine McCalpin from the University of West Indies in Jamaica.

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

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A Washington Redskins fan watches the game in Landover, Md. Nick Wass/AP hide caption

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