Wednesday

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President Shows A 'Different Attitude' At State Of The Union

In his State of the Union address, President Obama said America needs a raise. Host Michel Martin checks in with journalists from Minnesota, California, and Missouri - to see how the President's speech played out across the country.

President Shows A 'Different Attitude' At State Of The Union

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Tuesday

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Daniel Pearl and Asra Nomani in Karachi in 2001 Courtesy Asra Nomani hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Asra Nomani

Law

New Orleans' Former Mayor Ray Nagin In Court For Corruption

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin is on trial, facing federal bribery charges. Host Michel Martin speaks with New Orleans reporter Eileen Fleming about the case, and the controversial man at the center of the storm.

New Orleans' Former Mayor Ray Nagin In Court For Corruption

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Monday

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U.S.

Gay Politicians: Washington's In Crowd Is Out

Eight openly gay members of Congress are on the cover of the National Journal. Host Michel Martin speaks with Representative Mark Takano of California and Adam Kushman, executive editor of the National Journal, about gay power brokers in D.C.

Gay Politicians: Washington's In Crowd Is Out

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Kamala Khan, a Muslim teenager living in New Jersey, is the latest superhero to don the Ms. Marvel mantle. AP hide caption

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Movies

'Dear White People' A Hit At Sundance

The Sundance Film Festival wrapped up this weekend. Host Michel Martin and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Wesley Morris talk about some of the hits, including the satire Dear White People.

'Dear White People' A Hit At Sundance

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Friday

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Thursday

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Politics

Where Is The Line Between Political Scandal And Corruption?

What happens when state politicians get caught in hot water? Tell Me More looks at the scandals involving former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, and Texas state Senator Wendy Davis.

Where Is The Line Between Political Scandal And Corruption?

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Kenyan writer Binyavanga Wainaina, one of Africa's leading literary figures, publicly declared his homosexuality in an online essay last weekend. In an interview with NPR's Tell Me More, he said the recent anti-gay legislation in Africa influenced his decision to come out. He's shown here after giving a television interview in Nairobi on Wednesday. AP/Ben Curtis hide caption

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Parallels

Why Kenya's Best-Known Writer Decided To Come Out

Binyavanga Wainaina made the announcement in an online essay on his 43rd birthday. He says the recent anti-gay legislation in Uganda and Nigeria influenced his decision to speak out now.

Why Kenya's Best-Known Writer Decided To Come Out

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Race

People Assumed I Was A Tech Whiz Because I'm Asian

Philip Guo was on the fast track with his computer programming career. But he says that's because he's Asian and people assumed he was a whiz. He talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about benefiting from racial profiling.

People Assumed I Was A Tech Whiz Because I'm Asian

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Sports

Is The Color of Hockey Changing?

Hockey has been considered a white sport, but it's gaining popularity with minorities. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with journalist William Douglas about his blog The Color of Hockey, and his trip to Sochi for the Winter Olympics.

Is The Color of Hockey Changing?

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Wednesday

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Health

Latino Immigrants Find A Better Life In U.S., Poll Says

Many Latino immigrants come to the U.S. in search of a better life — and most of them find one, according to a new poll. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about the findings with Robert Blendon of the Harvard School of Public Health and Rey Junco of Purdue University.

Latino Immigrants Find A Better Life In U.S., Poll Says

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Law

High Point, NC Police Fight Crime Family Intervention Style

The city of High Point, North Carolina has seen a dramatic reduction in violent crime. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with High Point Police Chief Marty Sumner about the strategies he's using, and why other cities are turning to High Point for advice.

High Point, NC Police Fight Crime Family Intervention Style

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Komla Dumor, who hosted the BBC program Focus on Africa and was perhaps the best-known journalist on the continent, died of a heart attack last Saturday in London at age 41. BBC World Service/Flickr hide caption

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Tuesday

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Your Money

The Hard Truth About Defaulting On Student Loans

Skipping a student loan payment might seem like the easy way out — but it could be more trouble than it's worth. Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from Sandy Baum at the Urban Institute, who says parents and even grandparents could end up on the hook.

The Hard Truth About Defaulting On Student Loans

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U.S.

Why A 'White Guy' Bought A House In Detroit For $500

When Drew Philp bought a house in Detroit for $500, he thought it would take a lot of work to make it livable. But as he was fixing it up, he learned a lot about Detroit and rebuilding a city. He tells guest host Celeste Headlee about the experience.

Why A 'White Guy' Bought A House In Detroit For $500

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Parenting

Can You Really Parent Long Distance?

Parenting is hard enough when the family is under one roof. But what if your children are 300 — or even 3,000 miles away? Guest host Celeste Headlee hears from parents whose work, military service or divorce take them away from their children.

Can You Really Parent Long Distance?

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Monday

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Friday

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Health Care

Is The Obamacare Website Not Spanish Friendly?

The federal healthcare website seems to be running more smoothly now, but many Spanish speakers are reportedly still struggling with it. Host Michel Martin finds out why from Laura Martinez of CNET en Espanol, and Daniela Hernandez of Kaiser Health News.

Is The Obamacare Website Not Spanish Friendly?

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Africa

New Law Targets Gay People In Nigeria

Only days after Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan signed a law further criminalizing homosexuality, police have reportedly started rounding up gay men in Africa's most populous country. Host Michel Martin learns more from the BBC's Tomi Oladipo in Lagos.

New Law Targets Gay People In Nigeria

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Barbershop

Is Obama's Jobs 'Crusade' Focused?

President Obama is hoping to create new manufacturing jobs across the country, but how easy is it to create quality jobs? Host Michel Martin checks in with the Barbershop guys for their take on the week's news.

Is Obama's Jobs 'Crusade' Focused?

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Thursday

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Courtesy of Teju Cole

Digital Life

Teju Cole Writes A Story A Tweet At A Time

Nigerian-American writer Teju Cole has always used Twitter in creative ways. He recently asked a few dozen followers to tweet one line each, which he turned into a short story. Cole tells host Michel Martin more about the project.

Teju Cole Writes A Story A Tweet At A Time

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Movies

Oscar Nods Show 'Black & White' Year In Hollywood

The Oscar nominations are in! "American Hustle," "Gravity," and "12 Years a Slave" scored big. But did anything really surprise critics? Host Michel Martin speaks with actor and producer Rick Najera about the nods.

Oscar Nods Show 'Black & White' Year In Hollywood

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