Wednesday

View show

Sports

Sochi Has Diversity But 'Blackness' Isn't Part Of It

Host Michel Martin gets a preview of the Winter Olympics, from the athletes to the accommodations. She talks with NPR's Sonari Glinton, and McClatchy's William Douglas, who are in Sochi for the Games.

Sochi Has Diversity But 'Blackness' Isn't Part Of It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271997414/271997415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld appear on NBC News' Today show. Peter Kramer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Peter Kramer/Getty Images
View show

Tuesday

View show

Politics

House Republicans' New Immigration Proposals: 'Trap' or Opportunity?

House Republicans recently rolled out a set of immigration "principles" at their annual retreat. Fernando Espuelas of Univision, and National Review columnist Mario Loyola, tell host Michel Martin their thoughts on the proposals.

House Republicans' New Immigration Proposals: 'Trap' or Opportunity?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271514066/271514067" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Money Coach

MyRA and IRA: Understanding Options For Your Retirement Savings

Host Michel Martin talks with financial planner Louis Barajas about how IRAs work, and how investors can use them to help people prepare for retirement.

MyRA and IRA: Understanding Options For Your Retirement Savings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271514073/271514074" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Aging

Not Dead Yet: Aging Parents Also Struggle With Caretaking

There's a lot to be said about the difficulties of caring for an aging parent, but writer Judy Oppenheimer says things are hardest for the actual aging parent. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her Slate article "Not Dead Yet."

Not Dead Yet: Aging Parents Also Struggle With Caretaking

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271514080/271514105" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Parenting

Calling Kids With Disabilities 'Heroes' Can Be Damaging, Says Parent

Sarah Sweatt Orsborn's young daughter has a disability, but she says that doesn't make her toddler a hero. For more, host Michel Martin speaks with Orsborn and fellow mother, Eliana Tardio.

Calling Kids With Disabilities 'Heroes' Can Be Damaging, Says Parent

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271514111/271514112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Can I Just Tell You?

Why Doing The Right Thing Doesn't Always Work In A 'Rules World'

Host Michel Martin shares her thoughts on rules and how they trap people from following their instincts, in her regular 'Can I Just Tell You' essay.

Why Doing The Right Thing Doesn't Always Work In A 'Rules World'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271514118/271514119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Monday

View show

Your Money

MyRA: Understanding President Obama's Retirement Savings Plan

Almost half of American households live with little to no savings. President Obama has a new plan to fix that — the "myRA" savings account. Host Michel Martin talks about the plan with TIME magazine's Rana Foroohar and NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax.

MyRA: Understanding President Obama's Retirement Savings Plan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/270947079/270947080" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Television

Seinfeld, Coca-Cola and Cheerios: Which Super Bowl Ads Scored?

The Seattle Seahawks dominated the Super Bowl, but for some people, the ads stole the show. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR TV critic Eric Deggans to find out which commercials hit the mark, and which fell short.

Seinfeld, Coca-Cola and Cheerios: Which Super Bowl Ads Scored?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/270947086/270947087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jeta Amata attends a Black November screening in 2012. Paul Morigi/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Paul Morigi/Getty Images

Black History Month: #AfroGlobal

Hollywood, Bollywood, Make Way For Nollywood

As part of Black History Month, Tell Me More is featuring exciting voices from Africa and the Diaspora. Host Michel Martin speaks to Nollywood director Jeta Amata about being part of a film industry that is now bigger than Hollywood.

Hollywood, Bollywood, Make Way For Nollywood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/269512144/271105986" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tim Duffy
View show

Friday

View show

Antoinette Tuff at NPR's DC headquarters. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Amy Ta/NPR

Faith Matters

How One Woman's Faith Stopped A School Shooting

Antoinette Tuff prevented a mass shooting at an elementary school last year by calming down the mentally ill gunman. Tuff speaks with host Michel Martin about her new memoir Prepared for a Purpose, and that fateful day in Georgia.

How One Woman's Faith Stopped A School Shooting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268417580/269442424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Barbershop

The Super Bowl: Looking Forward To The 'Spectacle'

The Super Bowl is upon us! From the commercials, to counting how many times Peyton Manning yells "Omaha," the Barbershop guys share what they're looking forward to the most.

The Super Bowl: Looking Forward To The 'Spectacle'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/269442430/269442431" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Thursday

View show

Africa

Egypt: 'A Very Divided Nation Right Now'

The third anniversary of the Egyptian uprising finds its democratically elected president on trial. So where does that leave the rest of the country? Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR's Cairo Bureau Chief Leila Fadel about the latest in Egypt.

Egypt: 'A Very Divided Nation Right Now'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268871173/268871180" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S.

Effects Of Gun Violence Are Long Lasting And Wide Ranging, Says Expert

About 20 children and adolescents head to the hospital for gun-related injuries every day, according to a new report from the medical journal Pediatrics. Host Michel Martin speaks with Dr. Robert Sege, one of the study's authors, about the wide effect of gun injuries.

Effects Of Gun Violence Are Long Lasting And Wide Ranging, Says Expert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268871186/268871190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sports

Could Northwestern Football Union Even Out College Priorities?

Labor leaders say most of the players on Northwestern University's football team want to form a union. Host Michel Martin speaks with former Wildcats' quarterback Kain Colter, and National College Players Association President Ramogi Huma about the effort.

Could Northwestern Football Union Even Out College Priorities?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268871199/268871203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Darren Phillip Jones

Music

'Spirit Of Family' Unites Ladysmith Black Mambazo

South Africa's award-winning Ladysmith Black Mambazo has been singing its message of peace and unity for 50 years. The group joins host Michel Martin for a special performance chat.

'Spirit Of Family' Unites Ladysmith Black Mambazo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268839609/268871209" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Wednesday

View show

President Shows A 'Different Attitude' At State Of The Union

In his State of the Union address, President Obama said America needs a raise. Host Michel Martin checks in with journalists from Minnesota, California, and Missouri - to see how the President's speech played out across the country.

President Shows A 'Different Attitude' At State Of The Union

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268240738/268240740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Tuesday

View show

Daniel Pearl and Asra Nomani in Karachi in 2001 Courtesy Asra Nomani hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Asra Nomani

Law

New Orleans' Former Mayor Ray Nagin In Court For Corruption

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin is on trial, facing federal bribery charges. Host Michel Martin speaks with New Orleans reporter Eileen Fleming about the case, and the controversial man at the center of the storm.

New Orleans' Former Mayor Ray Nagin In Court For Corruption

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/267608437/267608438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Monday

View show

U.S.

Gay Politicians: Washington's In Crowd Is Out

Eight openly gay members of Congress are on the cover of the National Journal. Host Michel Martin speaks with Representative Mark Takano of California and Adam Kushman, executive editor of the National Journal, about gay power brokers in D.C.

Gay Politicians: Washington's In Crowd Is Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/267029369/267029370" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kamala Khan, a Muslim teenager living in New Jersey, is the latest superhero to don the Ms. Marvel mantle. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Movies

'Dear White People' A Hit At Sundance

The Sundance Film Festival wrapped up this weekend. Host Michel Martin and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Wesley Morris talk about some of the hits, including the satire Dear White People.

'Dear White People' A Hit At Sundance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/267029390/267029391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show

Friday

View show
View show

Thursday

View show

Politics

Where Is The Line Between Political Scandal And Corruption?

What happens when state politicians get caught in hot water? Tell Me More looks at the scandals involving former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, and Texas state Senator Wendy Davis.

Where Is The Line Between Political Scandal And Corruption?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/265239081/265239082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kenyan writer Binyavanga Wainaina, one of Africa's leading literary figures, publicly declared his homosexuality in an online essay last weekend. In an interview with NPR's Tell Me More, he said the recent anti-gay legislation in Africa influenced his decision to come out. He's shown here after giving a television interview in Nairobi on Wednesday. AP/Ben Curtis hide caption

toggle caption AP/Ben Curtis

Parallels

Why Kenya's Best-Known Writer Decided To Come Out

Binyavanga Wainaina made the announcement in an online essay on his 43rd birthday. He says the recent anti-gay legislation in Uganda and Nigeria influenced his decision to speak out now.

Why Kenya's Best-Known Writer Decided To Come Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/265239088/265239089" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Race

People Assumed I Was A Tech Whiz Because I'm Asian

Philip Guo was on the fast track with his computer programming career. But he says that's because he's Asian and people assumed he was a whiz. He talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about benefiting from racial profiling.

People Assumed I Was A Tech Whiz Because I'm Asian

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/265239095/265239096" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sports

Is The Color of Hockey Changing?

Hockey has been considered a white sport, but it's gaining popularity with minorities. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with journalist William Douglas about his blog The Color of Hockey, and his trip to Sochi for the Winter Olympics.

Is The Color of Hockey Changing?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/265239109/265239110" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
View show