Friday

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Research News

'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

The Havasupai Native American tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day this week. That's the anniversary of their legal victory over researchers who misused members' blood samples without proper consent.

'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

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Thursday

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Digital Life

The Ten Commandments In The Digital Age

From adultery to envy, is social media making it harder to honor the Ten Commandments? Paul Edwards of The Deseret News talks about its series on how the Commandments fit into American life today.

The Ten Commandments In The Digital Age

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Education

First Lady Of Men's Studies Says Passion Is Key

A woman now leads the American Men's Studies Association at a time when some academics are question its future. AMSA president Daphne Watkins talks about what's ahead for the organization.

First Lady Of Men's Studies Says Passion Is Key

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Arts & Life

Debbie Allen On 'Fame,' Stage And Men In Tights

Debbie Allen won Fame for playing an iconic dance teacher in film and television. Now, she's getting new fans for roles on shows like Grey's Anatomy. She talks about the highs and lows of her career.

Debbie Allen On 'Fame,' Stage And Men In Tights

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Wednesday

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Education

Proponents Of Affirmative Action Losing The Battle?

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan's ban on using race as a factor in public university admissions. Tell Me More looks at the internal debate within the affirmative action movement.

Proponents Of Affirmative Action Losing The Battle?

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Around the Nation

Kansas Residents To First Lady: Stay Out

Guest restrictions and increased security measures are looming as Michelle Obama plans to appear at a Kansas high school graduation next month. Thousands have petitioned to revoke her invitation.

Kansas Residents To First Lady: Stay Out

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Education

Can High-Quality Preschool Make A Big Difference Later On?

President Obama has challenged Congress to provide high-quality preschool for all 4 year olds. NPR's education team traveled to Tulsa, Okla., to learn about the benefits and challenges of the plan.

Can High-Quality Preschool Make A Big Difference Later On?

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Music

Yaya Alafia's Songs Of Strength For Her Baby Boy

2013 was a big year for actress and model Yaya Alafia. She starred in three films and had a baby boy. Alafia shares the songs reflecting those experiences for Tell Me More's series 'In Your Ear.'

Yaya Alafia's Songs Of Strength For Her Baby Boy

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Tuesday

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Your Health

Psychological Consequences Of Calling Obesity A Disease

Does thinking about obesity as a disease lead to bad diet choices? A new study suggests so. Crystal Hoyt talks about her new research. Physician Dr. Leslie Walker also weighs in.

Psychological Consequences Of Calling Obesity A Disease

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Monday

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Economy

President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message

President Obama visits several Asian countries this week. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with business journalists Sudeep Reddy and Roben Farzad about what the trip could mean for the U.S. economy.

President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message

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Education

A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

Richard Rhoda of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission discusses a new program that will cover up to two years of community college tuition for all graduates of the state's high schools.

A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

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Around the Nation

No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

A growing number of American mothers are staying home to raise their children, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center. Listeners share their own stories about making that choice.

No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

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Digital Life

Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug

The recent Heartbleed bug may have prompted many people to change their passwords, but as the Huffington Post's Gerry Smith explains, hackers have been taking sensitive information hostage for years.

Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug

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Rap group Run-DMC at the second annual MTV Video Music Awards. Does the group belong in the Library of Congress? Suriani/AP hide caption

toggle caption Suriani/AP

Music

Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-DMC?

The Library of Congress recently added 25 new recordings to its National Recording Registry, but none of them were hip-hop or rap songs. Did it miss a beat?

Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-DMC?

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Friday

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Education

15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

The mass shooting at Columbine High School spurred schools to adopt "zero tolerance" policies. Do they work? NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez and former principal Bill Bond discuss.

15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

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Faith Matters

To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque

In the fight against Islamic extremism, the president of the Muslim Public Affairs Council says that intervention within the community is more effective than external surveillance and secrecy.

To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque

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Faith Matters

New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays

President of the Muslim Democratic Club of New York Linda Sarsour discusses why she wants the city's public schools to close on holidays like Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.

New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays

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Faith Matters

Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea?

A shortage of gefilte fish is causing panic in the middle of Passover. But New York Times reporter Matt Chaban says some observant Jews are OK with not having to eat the love-it-or-hate-it appetizer.

Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea?

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Thursday

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Law

Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream

Howard Dean Bailey made a good life for himself in the U.S. But then, a decades-old run-in with the law led to his deportation. Does his story show the system failing or working?

Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream

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Media

Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

"Selfie" may have been the 2013 word of the year. But "belfies," or "butt selfies" are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.

Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

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Wednesday

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Extremist Attacks Show Boko Haram Can Strike Anywhere

The abduction of more than 100 schoolgirls in Nigeria may be just the latest act of terror from extremist group Boko Haram. We take a closer look at that organization's campaign of violence.

Extremist Attacks Show Boko Haram Can Strike Anywhere

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Syreeta McFadden has learned to capture various hues of brown skin. Syreeta McFadden/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Syreeta McFadden/Courtesy of the artist

Code Switch

Light And Dark: The Racial Biases That Remain In Photography

When Syreeta McFadden was young, she dreaded being photographed. Cameras made her skin look darkened and distorted. Now a photographer herself, she's learned to capture various hues of brown skin.

Light And Dark: The Racial Biases That Remain In Photography

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Tuesday

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A Boston Red Sox cap left at a makeshift memorial on the Boston Marathon route. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Around the Nation

A Year After Boston Marathon Bombing, How Does Public Grief Help?

Flowers, running shoes and posters were sent to Boston after the marathon bombing happened. Tell Me More asks how public expressions of grief help people, even when they are far away from the tragedy.

A Year After Boston Marathon Bombing, How Does Public Grief Help?

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Rodolfo Arguedas (sadeugra)/iStockphoto

Parenting

Teen Sexting Not So Bad?

Many parents probably hope their teens will never share explicit cellphone messages or photos. But some researchers and parents now say sexting might just be a normal part of teen development.

Teen Sexting Not So Bad?

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Monday

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Health

Getting Enough Vitamin D: More Than Milk And Sunshine

New research finds that people with low levels of vitamin D are more likely to die from cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. Nutrition professor and author Marion Nestle explains.

Getting Enough Vitamin D: More Than Milk And Sunshine

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Your Money

The Dangers Of Defaulting On Student Loans

Loans allow many students to attend college, but they also leave graduates with big debt. The Urban Institute's Sandy Baum explains how skipping a loan payment could be more trouble than it's worth.

The Dangers Of Defaulting On Student Loans

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