Wednesday

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Tuesday

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In this photo taken Aug. 17, 2011, Justin Barker, the student who was beaten by six black schoolmates in Jena, La., in 2006, speaks with The Associated Press at his home in Trout, La. Five years after the events that sparked the biggest civil rights march in recent history, life seems to be back to normal in this little central Louisiana town. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP
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Monday

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International rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar says Ramadan gives him a sense of appreciation for life. Courtesy Of Arsalan Iftikhar hide caption

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Courtesy Of Arsalan Iftikhar

Religion

Reflections Of Ramadan From Childhood

For the past month, Muslims around the world have been fasting in observance of Ramadan. Regular contributor Arsalan Iftikhar and his friend, Rabiah Ahmed, share childhood memories of their families observing the fast.

Reflections Of Ramadan From Childhood

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Friday

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Visitors at the new Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial on Tuesday. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Amy Ta/NPR

BackTalk

Listeners Weigh In On MLK, Jr. Memorial

Host Michel Martin and NPR Digital News Correspondent Corey Dade comb through listeners' comments about the new Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. Dade also talks about the ambitious way that King's fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha, helped make the memorial a reality.

Listeners Weigh In On MLK, Jr. Memorial

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Chuck Brown performs at NPR. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Amy Ta/NPR

Music Articles

Chuck Brown: The 'Godfather Of Go-Go' At 75

Brown will receive a tribute from the National Symphony Orchestra during a concert next month. Here, he and the NSO's principal pops conductor, Steven Reineke, discuss music with host Michel Martin.

Chuck Brown: The 'Godfather Of Go-Go' At 75

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The statue shows King emerging from a stone extracted from a mountain. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Amy Ta/NPR
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Thursday

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Author Susan Straight and her daughters in Central Park in November 2010. From left to right: Gaila Sims, Delphine Sims, Rosette Sims and Susan Straight. Courtesy Of The Author hide caption

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Courtesy Of The Author
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Wednesday

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Visitors at the new Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial on Tuesday. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Amy Ta/NPR

The statue shows King emerging from a stone extracted from a mountain. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Amy Ta/NPR
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Tuesday

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A demonstrator smashes a poster of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi during a protest outside the Libyan embassy in Ankara on August 22, 2011. Fighting rages in Libya today, a day after jubilant rebels overran the symbolic heart of the capital. ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images

Recording artists Nick Ashford and Valerie Simpson attend the Alvin Ailey Opening Night Gala Performance at the New York City Center in 2009. Ashford died from throat cancer Monday. He was 70 years old. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Remembrances

Legendary Motown Singer-Songwriter Dies

Nick Ashford passed away Monday after battling throat cancer. He was age 70. He and his wife Valerie Simpson wrote some of the most memorable R&B hits from the 1960's, including "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" and "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing."

Legendary Motown Singer-Songwriter Dies

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Former IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn and his wife, Anne Sinclair, leave a hearing at New York State Supreme Court on Tuesday after a judge dismissed sex charges against him. Strauss-Kahn thanked supporters and said that the period since his arrest had been a "nightmare." Stan Honda /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda /AFP/Getty Images
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Monday

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Michael Wardian is making his way toward the top of Townes Pass during the Badwater Ultramarathon. Colin Cooley hide caption

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Colin Cooley

Many individuals with body dysmorphic disorder turn to plastic surgery. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Hard times are hitting many Americans in this economy. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com
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Friday

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President Obama and his daughter Malia ride bicycles along a path on Martha's Vineyard, Mass., in August 2010. Obama is returning to the island for his vacation this summer. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

An HIV/AIDS awareness ribbon. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Basketball players from Georgetown University and China's Bayi Rockets team traded punches during their game, Thursday August 18, 2011. Yangshizhonh-China Daily/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yangshizhonh-China Daily/AFP/Getty Images
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Thursday

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A post office in Washington, D.C., Thursday August 18, 2011. Amy Ta/NPR hide caption

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Amy Ta/NPR

Business

There's Always Work At The Post Office? Maybe Not

The U.S. Postal Service proposed this month to cut 120,000 jobs. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with two former postal workers about what the USPS means to them, whether Americans still need the post office like they used to, and what the the future of USPS may entail.

There's Always Work At The Post Office? Maybe Not

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Boyz II Men in 1995. Dan Grohong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Grohong/AFP/Getty Images
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