Presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff (center) campaigns in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, alongside outgoing President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva. Pedro Vilela/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A City's Revolutionary Past Shapes Brazil's Election

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Biologists are relocating species such as this juvenile Mojave Desert tortoise due to the planned construction of BrightSource Energy's solar plant in southern California. Sarah McBride for NPR hide caption

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The Tortoise And The Solar Plant: A Mojave Story

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Born Ehrich Weiss, Harry Houdini, a rabbi's son, emigrated from Budapest to Appleton, Wis., in 1878. Courtesy of The National Portrait Gallery/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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The Magic Of Harry Houdini's Staying Power

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Tim Scott, Republican candidate for the U.S. House in South Carolina's 1st District, speaks to a crowd during a campaign event in North Charleston, S.C. South Carolina voters could make history Tuesday by electing the first black Republican congressman from the Deep South since Reconstruction. Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Black Republican Set To Make History In S.C.

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Drummer Terri Lyne Carrington's The Mosaic Project will be released in the U.S. early next year. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Women In Jazz: Taking Back All-Female Ensembles

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