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Before evacuating from Katrina, Bobbie Jennings (right) lived next door to her twin sister, Gloria Williams, in the public housing that existed on the same site as Harmony Oaks in New Orleans. While Jennings likes the actual apartment, she says she is unhappy with the new development because the new apartments do not provide the same sense of community as before. Katie Hayes/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Katie Hayes/NPR

Around the Nation

New Orleans' Public Housing Slowly Evolving

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Sunbathers walk along the beach in Pensacola Beach, Fla. on Aug. 1. Local business officials are asking for a substantial federal investment in getting tourists back to the coast after the peak summer season was wiped out by the oil spill. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Dave Martin/AP

U.S.

Officials Try To Calm Fears In Spill Aftermath

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This 1905 steam engine powered factories in Holland, Mich., for more than half a century (with a four-year break during the Great Depression). It now sits as a monument to the city's industrial heritage. Scott Horsley/NPR hide caption

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Reporter's Notebook

Michigan Town's Engine Shows It Could. Can It Again?

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