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Galaxies In Collision

Arp 148 which shows two galaxies in collision, is located in the constellation of Ursa Major, the Great Bear, approximately 500 million light-years away. NASA, ESA, A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University) hide caption

toggle caption NASA, ESA, A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University)

Arp 148 which shows two galaxies in collision, is located in the constellation of Ursa Major, the Great Bear, approximately 500 million light-years away.

NASA, ESA, A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University)

Here is a wonderful image of two galaxies in the midst of a million-year-plus long collision.

From NASA's image of the day description:

"This interacting pair of galaxies is included in Arp's catalog of peculiar galaxies as number 148. Arp 148 is the staggering aftermath of an encounter between two galaxies, resulting in a ring-shaped galaxy and a long-tailed companion. The collision between the two parent galaxies produced a shockwave effect that first drew matter into the center and then caused it to propagate outwards in a ring. The elongated companion perpendicular to the ring suggests that Arp 148 is a unique snapshot of an ongoing collision."

It's worth noting that our galaxy and Andromeda will be doing this kind of dance in a few billion years (start worrying now, its never too early.)

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