For Those Who Disliked 'Treme' : A Blog Supreme Those who dissent from the majority opinion praising HBO's Treme may find that a recent article from GQ speaks for you. Sean Fennessey writes that "the reliance on [music] comes at Treme's expense" -- that it's good stuff, but not good television.
NPR logo For Those Who Disliked 'Treme'

For Those Who Disliked 'Treme'

Those who dissent from the majority opinion praising HBO's Treme may find that a recent recap from GQ speaks for you. Sean Fennessey writes that "the reliance on [music] comes at Treme's expense." And while fans of the show rush to defend it, I must say I read the criticism with some interest. As someone who vivisected every episode, it's a bit difficult for me to tell whether I truly, truly enjoyed the program or was just professionally obsessed. I know some New Orleans viewers — who generally embraced the show — were similarly confused: they had no idea what it looked like to non-residents, to those who were watching for entertainment and who were not overwhelmed by the emotional authenticity.

Fennessey's assertion that "[m]usic on TV almost never works" is a pretty vast assertion to these eyes, but his overall message that Treme was a good idea but not good television may find some sympathetic ears. (While we're at it, John McWhorter has written another worthwhile dissenting opinion.) What do you think? [GQ: Why Treme Failed]


Related At NPR Music: Our weekly rundowns of the music of Treme, with New Orleans native Josh Jackson of WBGO.