How Much Of That Jelly Roll Are We Really Getting? : A Blog Supreme According to a study cited recently in The Daily Beast, jazz fans are 30 percent more sexually active than average Americans. But some commenters have their doubts about the veracity of our bedroom boasts.
NPR logo How Much Of That Jelly Roll Are We Really Getting?

How Much Of That Jelly Roll Are We Really Getting?

No, not that kind of jelly roll. iStockPhoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockPhoto

No, not that kind of jelly roll.

iStockPhoto

First there was The Daily Beast's revelation that "[p]eople with a strong preference for jazz are 30 percent more sexually active than the average American":

"Liking other types of music, such as rock or rap, was unrelated to sexual activity," write the authors of the psychology textbook from which this statistic is drawn. They hasten to add that liking jazz doesn't automatically make us into sex magnets: "Remember, a correlation between two factors does not necessarily indicate causality." Then again, sometimes it does.

And the response from Jezebel — the Gawker Media website aimed at women — which counter-claimed that "Poets, Jazz Fans Are Likely Bragging About Their Sex Lives":

According to the Daily Beast, the folks having the most sex are exactly the ones you'd expect: jazz lovers, poets, and drunk people. Or maybe they're simply the ones who are pretending to get the most action?

Ouch. So which is it, jazz fans? Are we doing a lot of One O'Clock Jumping? Or is it more like that composition's original title? RHETORICAL QUESTION DON'T ANSWER THAT AAAH. [The Daily Beast: Who's Having the Most Sex? / Jezebel: Poets, Jazz Fans Are Likely Bragging About Their Sex Lives]